Tag Archives: Sleep Guide

Sleep – tips and techniques

We are launching a new resource to help families who have a child with a brain condition to get a good night’s sleep. Sleep – tips and techniques for families who have a child with a brain condition explains techniques to help with the ten most common sleep problems including refusing to go to bed; not wanting to sleep alone, waking up during the night, waking up early.

We all need good quality sleep in order to learn new information, pay attention to the world around us, and store memories effectively. Sleep influences our mood, how hungry or full we feel, as well as fundamental biological processes such as cell development. Given the wide-reaching impact of sleep, it is not surprising that poor sleep has a significant negative impact on people.

Unfortunately, short and disrupted sleep is common in children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Children with autism, intellectual disabilities and a variety of rare genetic syndromes are at greatest risk of experiencing the negative consequences of poor sleep. What’s more, these children may already find learning new information, maintaining attention and regulating mood and behaviour very difficult; compromised sleep in these groups is therefore a huge concern.

Our Sleep Service helps families to get a better night’s sleep through one-to-one support, sleep workshops and sleep information resources.

The new booklet, Sleep – tips and techniques introduces and explains several different techniques that may help a child’s sleep and gives lots of illustrated hints and tips for putting them into practice. It includes 10 topics:

  • Bedtime routine
  • Calming time before sleep
  • A good sleep environment
  • Positive sleep associations
  • Using a comforting object
  • Gradual withdrawal from the bedroom
  • Moving bedtime backwards
  • Moving bedtime forwards
  • Creating a rewards system
  • Reducing daytime naps

Download booklet (PDF)

The information in the booklet is based on research at the Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders at the University of Birmingham. Through the Sleep Project they are leading cutting edge research to understand the different types and causes of sleep problems in children with neurodevelopmental disorders, identifying how poor sleep impacts on children and their families and trialling new interventions to reduce sleep problems more effectively.

The Sleep Tips guide can be downloaded free of charge. You can also access one-to-one support, find out about sleep workshops as well as download our comprehensive Sleep Guide.

We’ve planned a week of activity on social media around the launch of the new Sleep Tips booklet. Cerebra Sleep Week runs from 17th – 23rd September and will include lots of advice and support for families who may be struggling with lack of sleep. #Cerebrasleepweek.

What impact do sleep problems have?

Although the odd night of poor sleep may not affect daily abilities, persistent sleep problems can have a huge impact on individuals with and without intellectual disability and their friends, families, colleagues and carers. For all individuals, lack of sleep is associated with problems with mood, learning, memory and behaviour.

This article is taken from our Sleep Guide which you can download for free on our website.

Learning

Importantly, poor sleep affects motivation and concentration, which means that individuals who are experiencing sleep problems may make more errors at school/work, particularly on repetitive tasks. This means that if your child is struggling on ‘easier’ tasks at school (which are often repeated until they are ready to move on to harder tasks) it is worth speaking to their teacher, who may be under the impression that they are struggling because of their intellectual disability, rather than the sleep issues.

Sleep is also vital to a process called memory consolidation, where memories from the day (e.g. memory of that is learned at school) are strengthened. If sleep is disrupted these memories may not be stored properly, making it harder for children to use what they have already learned during the next day at school.

Challenging behaviour

Poor sleep may also reduce an individual’s ability to cope with changes in their routine. You may notice that your child shows more challenging behaviour (for example, self-injury, aggression, destruction) when they have not slept well the night before. This is common in children with intellectual disability and also in children and adults of typical development! We are all more irritable when we have not slept well and are therefore more likely to show behaviours which indicate that we would like certain tasks to end or situations to change.

Since individuals with intellectual disability may have limited ways to communicate their feelings and preferences, challenging behaviour can be a very effective way of indicating needs or desires (for example for a task to be taken away). It is natural for parents/carers/teachers to want to respond quickly to the challenging behaviour, which means that it is more likely to occur again the next time they want a task to be removed. For more information on mutual reinforcement of challenging behaviour, see “Parent response to waking” on page 10 of our Sleep Guide, and also our factsheet on Managing Challenging Behaviour.

Parents of children with intellectual disability therefore have a lot to do: comforting children with sleeping problems, acting as an advocate for their child’s learning and health, and managing challenging behaviour. Often parents and family members experience a loss of sleep themselves, which can make managing these aspects of parenting more difficult and may even contribute to low mood and impaired concentration.

It may feel as though your child’s sleep problem is out of your control or that you do not have he time/resources to invest in fixing it. However, after thorough assessment, there are some simple intervention strategies available in Part Three of the guide which can help to improve sleep.

You can download our Sleep Guide and our new tips and techniques booklet free of charge from our website. If you’d like some individual advice on tackling your child’s sleep issues please get in touch with our Sleep Team.

My child just won’t go to sleep

Small girl waking her parents early in the morning.This article takes a look at what you can do if your child just won’t go to sleep. It’s taken from our Sleep Guide which is available to download for free.

What should I do when my child just will not go to sleep?

Often settling problems can be caused by a lack of bedtime routine or perhaps the bedroom being associated with activities other than sleep. However, even after establishing a calming bedtime routine, it may be that your child does not want to go to sleep and cries out to you. This may be distressing for you as a parent to hear and your natural reaction may be to go back into your child’s bedroom.

As described in Part One of the Sleep Guide, this may be contributing to the problem, and so the next step for intervention would be to stop reinforcing the settling problem. This may require ‘ignoring’ your child’s cries, which is known as extinction. However, this can be very difficult for parents and children, so graduated extinction is recommended.

Agree a set amount of time (e.g. 2 minutes) that you will allow your child to cry for, before briefly checking on them.

  1. When your child has been crying for the 2 minutes, go in and check them. This checking should only be to reassure yourself that the child is alright and to tell them to go back to bed. When you check on them, do not offer physical interaction, music, or any other aspect of the bedtime routine.
  2. Leave the room and wait the agreed time before repeating the checking procedure.
  3. You may have to repeat this many times before your child eventually falls asleep, so it’s a good idea to start on Friday night or another evening where no one has school or work the next day.
  4. The next night, gradually increase the amount of time you allow before checking on your child (e.g. from 2 minutes to 4 minutes), and continue to keep the checking procedure brief.
  5. Repeat this until the child’s crying at settling reduces.

If the suggested times here are too long, try just waiting for one minute before checking and then gradually increase the time by 30 seconds each night. Eventually your child will learn to settle themselves to sleep without you there

If you’d like some individual advice on introducing this technique please get in touch with our Sleep Team. 

Accredited workshops on Accessing Public Services, DLA and Sleep

Guide to claiming disability living allowanceWe are delighted to announce that our workshops on Accessing Public Services, DLA and Sleep have been accredited by the CPD Certification Service.

This means that our information workshops have reached the required Continuing Professional Development standards and benchmarks and that the learning value of each has been examined to ensure integrity and quality.

Our research has shown that families can experience difficulties accessing public services, completing the Disability Living Allowance (DLA) forms and with their children getting a good night’s sleep. Our workshops aim to give families the knowledge, skills and confidence they need to tackle these issues.

Accessing Public Services

While UK law provides powerful rights to accessing health, social care and education support services, the law can be complicated and difficult to understand. Even when you know what your rights are, it can be daunting, exhausting and sometimes intimidating to challenge public officials. This workshop can support you by unpicking potential problems and give you the tools you need to resolve them. The workshop will help you get the best out of our Accessing Public Services Toolkit.

DLA

This workshop will help you to use our DLA Guide to complete the DLA claim form. It also looks at the common problem areas, busts some of the myths around DLA and gets you to assess whether you’re getting the correct rate of DLA for your child (if you already claim it). If you’re not, we’ll talk about how to go about challenging the decision. The workshop also takes a brief look at related benefits.

Sleep

We will help you to understand and support your child’s sleep. The workshop looks at why sleep is so important, what can affect it and strategies to improve problems such as settling, night waking, early rising and sleeping alone. The workshop supports the advice given in our Sleep Guide and by the end of the workshop you should feel more confident to tackle your child’s sleep problem.

If you would like to host one of these workshops please call us on our Freephone number 0800 3281159.