Summer reading

Summer reading

Are you looking for ways to entertain the children this summer? Did you know that you can borrow children’s books from our postal lending library? Check out some of the fab books we have available to borrow for free.

Age 5 – 8

The Five of Us by Quentin Blake

Angie, Ollie, Simon, Mario and Eric are five fantastic friends, each of whom has an unusual ability. Disaster strikes on a day out to the countryside but, working together and combining their individual powers the Fantastic Five save the day.

Avery by Marta Altes

Avery is like other birds most of the time, but sometimes, feels a bit different. But Avery is not alone.

Eagle Eyes by Jeanne Gehret

Like a river overflowing its banks, Ben wreaks havoc until he learns to recognise and control his ADHD. By the end of the book, Ben’s family wonders how they could have gotten along without his special way of seeing the world.

Age 8 -12

Of Mice and Aliens by Kathy Hoopman

When Ben and Andy discover an alien has crash landed in the backyard they’re faced with a problem. They want to help Zeke repair his ship, but why does he ask for such strange things? Can they trust him? This is a book of mystery and fun with Ben learning to cope with his newly diagnosed Asperger Syndrome and Zeke trying to cope with life on Earth, things are not always what they seem.

Monkey by Veronica Bennett

Harry Pritchard may be bullied at school and bored at home, but he’s not exactly thrilled when his mother volunteers him to visit a severely disabled patient of hers. She says it’ll do Harry good. But how can it end the bullying? Of get him a part in the drama club play? Or win the attentions of Louise Harding, the girl of his dreams? Well, Harry is in for some big surprises!

Stuck in Neutral by Terry Trueman

Shawn has severe cerebral palsy. No control over his muscles, no means of communication, no hope of improvement. Yet humour, joy and love sit alongside frustration in Shawn’s mind. His internal life is full of unseen pleasures, but his father perceives only the devastation of an uninhabited body. And Shawn suspects that as his father’s sorrow builds, so does his desire to act…

Age 13 plus

Haze by Kathy Hoopman

Seb is a loner. Brilliant with numbers but hopeless with people, he prefers the company of computers and his only friend Guzzle. Thing change for the better when he makes friends with Kristie, Madeline and Jen, and a new computer teacher, Miss Adonia arrives. However, Seb is soon caught up in a web of computer fraud and lies and turns to Madeline’s mysterious cyber friend for help.

Rules by Cynthia Lord

Twelve year old Catherine just wants a normal life. Which is near impossible when you have a brother with autism and a family that revolves around his disability. She’s spent years trying to teach David the rules from “a peach is not a funny-looking apple” to “no toys in the fish tank”. But the summer Catherine meets Kristi, the potential next-door friend she’s always wished for, her own behaviour turns everything upside down and forces her to ask “what is normal?”

Trueman Bradley – Aspie Detective by Alexi Maxim Russell

Trueman leaves his hometown of Heartville, Illinois and arrives in New York City where he is soon told that a guy with AS could not possibly succeed as a detective. However, it’s not long before Trueman’s crime-fighting skills are put to the test when he is robbed on this first day in New York and he sets about using his exceptional mathematical abilities to invent a crime-fighting equation.

e-books with BorrowBox

  • ‘I am Not Joey Pigza’ and ‘The Key That Swallowed Joey Pigza’ by Jack Gantos
  • ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time’ by Mark Haddon

e-audiobooks with BorrowBox

  • ‘Rent a Bridesmaid’ and ‘Clover Moon’ by Jacqueline Wilson
  • ‘Who Killed Darius Drake’ and ‘Freak the Mighty’ by Rodman Philbrick
  • ‘Peter Rabbit’ by Beatrix Potter

If you would like to become a Cerebra Library member or a Cerebra BorrowBox member to borrow books, e-books or e-audiobooks for your child to read or listen to, please contact Jan the librarian at janetp@cerebra.org.uk for more information.

Handy tips for summer holiday sleep

tips for sleeping during the summer holidays

During the summer holidays the change in routine and light, warmer nights can often make sleep difficult. It can be even harder for children who don’t sleep well anyway. Our sleep team give their top tips for getting a good night’s sleep this summer.

  • Keep the bedroom as dark as possible at bedtime. Well-fitted blackout blinds can be useful. This allows our natural melatonin to be produced.
  • In hot weather, during the day keep windows shut and curtains closed to keep rooms cooler. Open the window in the evening if you like, when there may be a little breeze.
  • Look at using cooling pads/cooling pillows if their room is very warm.
  • Avoid caffeine (e.g. Coffee, some fizzy drinks, chocolate etc) in the 6 hours before bedtime.
  • Try and keep bed and wake times consistent, eating at similar times also helps with our internal body clock.
  • Avoid exercise in the hours before bed – this raises our body temperature, which can make it harder to fall asleep.
  • Using visual resources can help with changes to routine (visual timetables, social stories, checklists etc).
  • Use a fan to help keep bedrooms cool – the white noise it produces can also be quite calming.
  • Spend an hour before bed engaging in calming/relaxing activities (if you are away take some with you).
  • If bedtime during holidays is significantly later than during school, spend the last week of the holidays slowly bringing this earlier by 15 minutes a night. This is much easier on our body clock than a big change in one night.
  • Run cold water over wrists and feet before bed to help keep cool, or have a bath before bed as this helps to cool the body. Try to avoid very cold showers as these can be stimulating.
  • Play calming music/white noise at bedtime and throughout the night to drown out the noise of others playing outside.

We hope these tips have helped but if you need more personal support our team would be happy to help. Visit our sleep pages for more information.

Travel insurance covering children with disabilities

travel insurance covering children with disabilities

At this time of year, one of the questions coming in to our helpline is about travel insurance that will cover children with pre-existing conditions. Many people have travel cover potentially included with a service they already use, such as car insurance, a membership subscription or a bank account, but they have looked in the small print and found that pre-existing conditions are excluded.

Should you be in this position and wish to know where to find an insurer that will provide cover, the list below is a place to start. Some of these companies only cover for certain conditions.

Listing these companies does not imply that Cerebra recommend any of them, only that we know they are there. Please make sure you check that they are suitable for your needs.

Insurance companies

A holiday advice organisation that may know of other insurers is Tourism for All.

Other things worth thinking about before travelling

Government advice about travel with disabilities, which includes insurance, booking, taking medication abroad, law, access, finance, airports and so on.

For travel in the UK, the National Key Scheme for access to toilets for people with disabilities (not all toilets are kept locked, but for those that are), http://nks.directenquiries.com/nks/page.aspx?pageid=10&tab=National+Key+Scheme&level=2 and

For travel in Europe, a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) is needed. These cards should be free of charge but they go out of date, so if you already have one it is worth checking that it will still be valid when you travel.  Further details: http://www.moneysavingexpert.com/travel/free-ehic-card.


This article was first written in June 2015. Updated August 2018.

Cara draws winning summer raffle tickets

Cara with CEO Chris Jones and some of our fundraisers

Cara with CEO Chris Jones and some of our fundraisers

On 25th July actress Cara Readle, who is one of our fabulous ambassadors, drew the winning tickets for our summer raffle.

Cara is currently in training to complete a duathlon challenge for us so Cerebra staff got into the spirit of the occasion and dressed up in their best workout clothes!

We hold two raffle draws every year, a summer and a winter raffle. You can find out more information about our raffles including how to purchase tickets and past winners here.

Cara to take on duathlon challenge

Cara Readle

Cara Readle

Swansea born actress Cara Readle, famous for her role in ‘The Story of Tracy Beaker’, will be taking on a duathlon on 20th August to raise money for Cerebra.

The 27 year-old, who was born with Cerebral Palsy, has been an Ambassador for us for several years and has never let anything stand in her way. Back in 2014, she completed a 2 mile walk in Mumbles from Black Pill to Verdi’s – a huge achievement.

As well as having many acting credits to her name already, Cara also graduated from the University of Wales Trinity Saint David with first degree honours in Performing Arts.

Cara’s latest challenge will see her embarking on a 5km walk on a treadmill and a 5km cycle on a static bike, all taking part over the course of a day at Xcercise4less gym in Swansea.

Cara said: “I have set out to do something that I know I will find very challenging but I wanted to challenge myself in order to raise money for Cerebra. It may take me all day, the walking will be the hardest part for me but I will compete it. I have started training for this and I have lots of support!”

Cara took time out of her busy training schedule on Wednesday 25th July to draw the winners for Cerebra’s summer raffle. Cerebra staff got in to the spirit of the occasion by dressing in their best workout gear!

You can sponsor Cara through her Just Giving page.

Epilepsy and getting a better night’s sleep

Jonah and Louise

Louise recently contacted our Sleep Service for some advice to help 9-year-old Jonah get a good night’s sleep. Jonah has recently been diagnosed with frontal lobe epilepsy and Louise told us their story.

Jonah has never been a great sleeper and not having a good night’s sleep just became a normal part of life for our family.

For a while we were trying to push him to sleep in his own room but then we starting noticing that something wasn’t quite right. He was making strange, rhythmic movements in his sleep.

We saw Jonah’s GP who told us to keep an eye on it but it steadily got worse. He would be waking up 3-5 times a night and this eventually developed into dystonic posturing – his right arm would go in the air and his leg would go stiff.

We started filming Jonah at night so that we could show the GP that his condition was worsening and of course, having so many seizures every night meant that none of us were getting much sleep. It was taking a toll on all of us and I began to feel extremely guilty about having tried to make him sleep in his own room when he’d been having seizures all along.

By February 2018, Jonah had been referred to an epilepsy specialist and we finally had enough evidence to show that Jonah was getting worse and they were able to diagnose him from this. They put Jonah on medication to help manage his seizures and he responded straight away which was great but it made him very tired in the day. This wasn’t helped by the fact that he still wasn’t settling well and he still didn’t want to be in his own room – part of me still wanted to keep an eye on him in case he had a seizure.

That’s when a friend suggested that we contact Cerebra’s Sleep Service for support. We received our sleep pack and immediately started using some of the tips that were in there.

Self-settling was the most important thing for us to get Jonah into the habit of doing because it meant that we wouldn’t have to intervene if he did wake in the night – he would just settle himself. We used the gradual withdrawal method to so that it was a gentler process for both us and Jonah and if he woke up during the night, we would just take him straight back to his room.

I first noticed an improvement about two and a half weeks in when Jonah got up in the middle of the night to use the bathroom and took himself straight back to bed. We were thrilled!

We’re now six months down the line and the change in not just Jonah but the whole family is unbelievable. I had been finding it more and more difficult to function in work because of the lack of sleep but now I’m doing much better and Jonah is also doing much better at school because he is now able to concentrate much better. We’re even moving him into his own big bedroom.

The Cerebra Sleep Service has been great because a lot of the sleep advice you usually find is for much younger children, but their advice really helped not just Jonah but the whole family finally get a good night’s sleep!

You can find out more about our Sleep Service and the support we offer here.

Delivering legal rights through practical problem solving

In this article we explain our Legal Entitlements and Problem-Solving (LEaP) Project with the Centre for Law and Social Justice, the School of Law, University of Leeds.

Why we started the Project

Disabled children and their families sometimes need extra support in order to have a normal everyday life – for example, help with bathing or eating, moving around or communicating. Local councils and the NHS have legal duties to meet these needs by providing support, such as someone to help with personal care at home, specialist equipment, adaptations, short breaks or therapy services. However, we know from our work with families that, in practice, parents often struggle to get the right support for their children and a lack of support can harm the health and well-being of the whole family.

The LEaP Project aims to find out why families struggle to get the help that they’re legally entitled to and what can be done to change things. We want to learn more about the problems families face, so that we can work out ways of overcoming them and helping families to get the support they need. The Project is led by Luke Clements, Professor of Law and Social Justice at the University of Leeds.

What we do

We invite families to tell us about the problems they face in getting the support they need. With expert support from the team at the University, we provide legal information and advice to help families overcome those difficulties. We help families to understand what their legal rights are and what they can do if they fail to get the support they need. We also use the information we get from individual cases to write template letters, factsheets and guides, which can help other families in similar situations.

When we see from our casework that several families are having similar problems, we ask our student volunteers at Leeds to study this problem in more detail (often by doing a survey) and then produce a report with ideas about how policy and practice can be changed to avoid these problems in the future. Past projects have looked at short breaks, school transport and disabled facilities grants.

Then we use the knowledge gained from our advice casework and student-led projects to improve our understanding of why these legal problems occur and to work out practical ways of overcoming them. We want to find out which problem-solving techniques help families to cope better with the challenges they face and how councils and the NHS can change the way they work.

What we’ve achieved so far

(1) We’ve attracted funding from the Economic and Social Research Council and from Leeds University, which has enabled us to fund a PhD student, develop our Problem-Solving Toolkit (see below) and fund a research assistant post at the University.

(2) In 2013 and 2014, we published compilations of our advice letters (the ‘Digests of Opinions’) to help other families in similar situations.

(3) In 2016, we published a report about ‘short breaks statements’ (these statements are published by councils in England and explain how families can get breaks from their caring responsibilities). The report considered how accessible and accurate these statements were.

(4) We published a guide for families in 2016 called the “Accessing Public Services Toolkit”. The Toolkit describes some of the common problems families face in dealing with councils and the NHS and suggests ways of solving those problems. A second edition was published in 2017, along with a separate version for families in Scotland. We’ve developed an ongoing programme of workshops across the U.K. to share the Toolkit with parent groups.

(5) In 2017, the student volunteers at Leeds interviewed a small number of families who had applied for a disabled facilities grant to pay for home adaptations. We published a report called “Disabled Children and the Cost Effectiveness of Home Adaptations and Disabled Facilities Grants”, which considered the benefits of investing in these adaptations, including cost savings and improvements in families’ well-being. The report was launched at a conference at the University of Leeds on 12 July 2017 and resulted in meetings with senior members of Leeds City Council, the NHS Leeds Clinical Commissioning Group Partnership and Foundations (the national body for Home Improvement Agencies), along with an article in the Guardian newspaper.

(6) On 12 July 2017, the Project Team also launched a research report called “Local Authority Home to School Online Transport Policies: Accessibility and Accuracy”. This report explains how difficult it is for families to find accurate information about school transport on council websites and how some transport policies are more restrictive than they should be. As a result of the report, the team met with representatives from the Department of Education and worked with the charity, Contact, on their inquiry into school transport, including giving evidence to a select committee at Parliament. The Department for Education has decided to review its guidance for councils on school transport and it is planning to produce an accessible template for council websites, so that school transport information is more easily available to families. The team has been asked to share its research data with the Department to help with this work.

(7) As a result of our casework, the Welsh Government has agreed to make its guidance on continence products more clear, so that families are no longer told that they can only have a maximum of 4 products a day.

(8) We’ve helped families in England and Wales get the services they need – and persuaded councils to change their policies so that other families aren’t disadvantaged. We’ve built on our casework by publishing parent guides, for example on school transport for England and Wales, so that we can share the lessons we’ve learned with many more families. We’ve also published a series of template letters and factsheets for parents to use.

Longer term impact of our research

We know that our work with families helps them to develop the knowledge, confidence and skills they need to get support:

• “Thank you for all your help and support. I don’t think I would have got anywhere without it.”
• “We appreciate the continued support to empower us to go through this process.”
• “I really do appreciate your support. I hadn’t realised there was so much info available to research.”

We will continue to support families and draw on their experiences to help us plan our research and publish resources which help other families in similar situations.

In 2018, our student volunteers will look at three research topics – how difficult it is to apply for a disabled facilities grant, how well the direct payments system works for disabled people and what social care charges disabled people have to pay for their care costs.

We also want to investigate how policies and practices within councils and the NHS can sometimes make it more difficult for families to get the support that they’re entitled to. We’re developing a detailed research plan, which will involve working with councils and the NHS to explore why these barriers exist and what can be done to remove them. We hope to get grant funding in 2018 for this important study, so that we can help to introduce changes within these organisations which will make it easier for more families to get the support they need.

The accessibility of Disabled Facilities Grant application forms

A survey has found that about half of local authorities in England do not make application forms freely available for home adaptation grants – known as Disabled Facilities Grants.

Key findings included:

  • The law imposes strict timescales for the processing Disabled Facilities Grants (DFGs) – but if local authorities withhold the application form, they can deny individuals their right to apply for a grant and stop the ‘clock ticking’ for the purposes of the statutory timescales.
  • As the research report notes, a failure to make forms available is not only frustrating the will of Parliament (para 5.02) it is also frustrating the will of the Government, which has increased significantly the relevant grant to local authorities for DFG awards (para 2.15-2.17);
  • Given the prevalence of the problem identified by the research it suggests that the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government should use his powers to ensure that failing local authorities act in accordance with the law and relevant guidance (para 5.11).

The Research was funded by the disabled children’s charity Cerebra and undertaken by students at the School of Law, Leeds University under the supervision of Professor Luke Clements with support from the Access Committee for Leeds a Disabled People’s Organisation with national expertise in home adaptations.

Download the full report (PDF)

Last year a similar research project, concerning adaptations to family homes to accommodate the needs of young people with Autistic Spectrum Disorders suggested that adaptations of this kind were highly cost effective (that an investment in adaptations amounting to £300,000 had avoided social services expenditure of about £1.5 million – ie a five-fold return on the investment). You can read the 2017 report here.

Disability related expenditure and pets care costs

A survey has found that many disabled people are unable to afford to keep a pet dog or cat due to the impact of council charges made for their social care support.

A survey of 46 English social services authorities found that eight out of ten would not make allowances for pet care expenses ‘in any circumstances’ when calculating the charges disabled people were required to pay for their social care services.

Background

For many disabled people their pet is of incalculable importance to their sense of well-being. Many experience severe isolation and for many their pet is their main companion. The report outlines the evidence suggesting that pets can have profoundly beneficial impacts on key measures of well-being: physical, mental and emotional – as well as providing for many a sense of security.

This research appears to be the first concerning the impact of local authority social care charging on pet owning disabled people living in the community.

Findings include:

  • Despite the evidence concerning the generally positive impact of pet ownership on well-being and the many social policy references to pet ownership as a potentially innovative mechanism for addressing eligible social care outcomes for disabled people, no local authority had a written policy concerning the treatment of such expenditure (para 7.07).
  • Only five authorities (11% of the sample) indicated that such costs could be taken into account ‘in any circumstances’ – although on analysis it appears that nine (19%) would in fact be prepared to consider such costs ‘on a case by case’ basis (para 7.07).
  • Local authority charges that ignore pet care costs will subject disabled people to severe hardship. After paying their council’s social care charge, disabled adults under pension age are likely to be left with no more than £75.25 per week (and in some cases as little as £48.17) from which they are expected to pay for (among other things) their food, gas, water, electricity, telephone bills, travel costs, clothing, house repairs, equipment purchase, insurance expenses and recreational activities (para 4.04).

The research recommendations include that the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care require that where reasonable pet care costs be taken into account for charging purposes (by amending the list of items in the Statutory Guidance at Annex C para 40).

The Research was undertaken by students at the School of Law, Leeds University as part of the School’s Cerebra Legal Entitlements and Problem-Solving (LEaP) Project and pro bono programmes under the supervision of Professor Luke Clements and Sorcha McCormack.

Download the full report (PDF)

Knowledge Transfer Partnership success!

We are delighted to announce that we have been successful in our Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) bid with the Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, Cardiff University. This KTP is funded by Welsh Government and Innovate UK. This is what it is about.

What is a Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP)?

The Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) scheme helps businesses in the UK to innovate and grow. It does this by linking them with an academic or research institute and a graduate. A KTP enables a business to bring in new skills and the latest academic thinking to deliver a specific, strategic innovation project through a knowledge-based partnership.

Each KTP is a 3-way partnership between:

  • a UK-based business or a not-for-profit organisation
  • an academic or research institute
  • a suitably-qualified graduate, with the capability to lead a strategic business project

We have support from Cardiff and Vale NHS Trust, Cardiff Business School and The National Centre for Mental Health (NCMH) at Cardiff University. The KTP will allow us to develop new skills that we can use in other ongoing Cerebra work, and vice versa. The skills we have learnt from other Cerebra projects will also be beneficial in this project. The KTP has synergy with our academic partnerships with the universities of Birmingham, Warwick and Leeds.

Who are the Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, Cardiff University?

The Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences (IPMCN) conduct high quality research into neurodevelopmental disorders and mental health problems. A main research interest is to learn more about the early origins, development and impacts of neurodevelopmental and mental health problems on children, young people and their families.

Their overall aim is to improve prevention, interventions and policy. The experiences of people with copy number variants (ECHO) study group within the Institute is led by Professor Marianne van den Bree and focuses on people with genetic conditions caused by chromosome changes called ‘Copy Number Variants’ (CNVs).

The Project

The project aim is to develop more effective ways of ensuring families of children with intellectual and developmental disorders (IDDs) have greater access to modern personalised genomic and integrated psychiatry services according to parents’ needs and preferences.

The project focuses on children and young people with CNVs. Some children with CNVs have a small segment of their DNA repeated (a duplication), other may have a segment missing (a deletion). Some CNVs appear to have little or no effect on children’s health or development, but some can be very serious. CNVs are a significant cause of learning difficulties, developmental delay, serious medical health problems and increased risk of psychiatric disorders, such as ADHD, autism, of schizophrenia.

Our project aims to develop more effective ways of ensuring children with intellectual and developmental disorders (IDDs) have greater access to modern, personalised genetic and integrated psychiatry services according to parents’ needs and preferences. This KTP aims to transform our capability to support families of children with these genetic disorders by taking advantage of new knowledge and capabilities from the Cardiff University Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences to develop new solutions and joint partnerships that will bring lasting benefit to thousands of children and their families.

The Chief Medical Officer’s report 2012 on children with IDD stated many disabled children have serious difficulties accessing statutory services, and inadequate co-ordination within and between services is a major concern. Our own Accessing Public Services work certainly supports this finding. The Welsh Government’s Strategic Plan for Rare Disorders is committed to promoting equality of access for everyone with a rare disease to follow clear care pathways providing high quality services through integrated personal care plans. This KTP will address the problems identified by The Chief Medical Officer and contribute to turning the Welsh Government’s strategic goal into a reality for children and their families.

This KTP has the opportunity to benefit at least 3,500 children in Wales with rare developmental disorders attributed to CNVs. In England over 10,000 children per year are diagnosed with CNVs. As genetic testing becomes even more effective, cheaper and informative the numbers of children receiving genetic diagnoses will accelerate. The long-term potential impact of this KTP is therefore significant in this emerging branch of medicine. Knowing which CNVs carry risk of debilitating psychiatric illness; understanding environmental influences; and being able to recognise key signs of high risk will help earlier and more appropriate intervention. Thus, this KTP has the opportunity to improve longer term outcomes for children and their families.

The ECHO study research team consist of world leading academics and clinicians. Over the last 10 years it has built one of the largest and most detailed studies of individuals with CNV internationally. Studying these children over time, major insights have been gained into their development, strengths and weaknesses. In harness with our expertise around working with families and developing award winning information resources this partnership will further Cerebra’s goal of maximising the empowerment of anxious families to access the best care for their children and also enable us to engage with and influence multi-disciplinary services on behalf of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

The KTP will develop efficient cross-disciplinary working between Cerebra, IPMCN, Cardiff Business School, and The National Centre for Mental Health and statutory and voluntary sector partners. We will pilot new approaches within Cardiff and Vale NHS trust with the long-term aim of advising and supporting other NHS Trusts to adopt similar approaches thus improving outcomes for children and their families.

As part of this KTP we will:

  • Identify other voluntary organisations supporting children with IDD and involve them in the stakeholder advisory panel.
  • Develop strong partnerships with small condition specific support groups developing cooperative approaches to sharing and developing information resources.
  • Use our current skills, capabilities and family contacts to develop high quality accessible multimedia resources for families.
  • Work collaboratively with service providers to develop and test a model way of working to achieve improved health and education outcomes for children. An approach that can be shared and developed across authorities.
  • Contribute to teaching and training at the University Medical School, ensuring future generations of clinicians are better equipped to deliver services to help children with intellectual and developmental disorders in harmony with the wishes of their families.

Costs

Two thirds of the cost of this ground-breaking and very exciting new project is being met by the Welsh Government with the balance needing to be raised through the generosity of Cerebra’s amazing supporters.
Our contribution to this project, which will have far-reaching effects, is just under £2,000 per month for the next three years.

If you would like to be a part of something amazing and help make a real and lasting difference to the lives of children with brain conditions and their families then please make a donation towards the costs – your contribution, no matter how small, will help others.

You could call Debbie on 01267 244206 to make a one off or regular donation or donate on-line. Our website also has some great fundraising ideas.