Category Archives: Practical Help

Travel insurance covering children with disabilities

travel insurance covering children with disabilities

At this time of year, one of the questions coming in to our helpline is about travel insurance that will cover children with pre-existing conditions. Many people have travel cover potentially included with a service they already use, such as car insurance, a membership subscription or a bank account, but they have looked in the small print and found that pre-existing conditions are excluded.

Should you be in this position and wish to know where to find an insurer that will provide cover, the list below is a place to start. Some of these companies only cover for certain conditions.

Listing these companies does not imply that Cerebra recommend any of them, only that we know they are there. Please make sure you check that they are suitable for your needs.

Insurance companies

A holiday advice organisation that may know of other insurers is Tourism for All.

Other things worth thinking about before travelling

Government advice about travel with disabilities, which includes insurance, booking, taking medication abroad, law, access, finance, airports and so on.

For travel in the UK, the National Key Scheme for access to toilets for people with disabilities (not all toilets are kept locked, but for those that are), http://nks.directenquiries.com/nks/page.aspx?pageid=10&tab=National+Key+Scheme&level=2 and

For travel in Europe, a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) is needed. These cards should be free of charge but they go out of date, so if you already have one it is worth checking that it will still be valid when you travel.  Further details: http://www.moneysavingexpert.com/travel/free-ehic-card.


This article was first written in June 2015. Updated August 2018.

Delivering legal rights through practical problem solving

In this article we explain our Legal Entitlements and Problem-Solving (LEaP) Project with the Centre for Law and Social Justice, the School of Law, University of Leeds.

Why we started the Project

Disabled children and their families sometimes need extra support in order to have a normal everyday life – for example, help with bathing or eating, moving around or communicating. Local councils and the NHS have legal duties to meet these needs by providing support, such as someone to help with personal care at home, specialist equipment, adaptations, short breaks or therapy services. However, we know from our work with families that, in practice, parents often struggle to get the right support for their children and a lack of support can harm the health and well-being of the whole family.

The LEaP Project aims to find out why families struggle to get the help that they’re legally entitled to and what can be done to change things. We want to learn more about the problems families face, so that we can work out ways of overcoming them and helping families to get the support they need. The Project is led by Luke Clements, Professor of Law and Social Justice at the University of Leeds.

What we do

We invite families to tell us about the problems they face in getting the support they need. With expert support from the team at the University, we provide legal information and advice to help families overcome those difficulties. We help families to understand what their legal rights are and what they can do if they fail to get the support they need. We also use the information we get from individual cases to write template letters, factsheets and guides, which can help other families in similar situations.

When we see from our casework that several families are having similar problems, we ask our student volunteers at Leeds to study this problem in more detail (often by doing a survey) and then produce a report with ideas about how policy and practice can be changed to avoid these problems in the future. Past projects have looked at short breaks, school transport and disabled facilities grants.

Then we use the knowledge gained from our advice casework and student-led projects to improve our understanding of why these legal problems occur and to work out practical ways of overcoming them. We want to find out which problem-solving techniques help families to cope better with the challenges they face and how councils and the NHS can change the way they work.

What we’ve achieved so far

(1) We’ve attracted funding from the Economic and Social Research Council and from Leeds University, which has enabled us to fund a PhD student, develop our Problem-Solving Toolkit (see below) and fund a research assistant post at the University.

(2) In 2013 and 2014, we published compilations of our advice letters (the ‘Digests of Opinions’) to help other families in similar situations.

(3) In 2016, we published a report about ‘short breaks statements’ (these statements are published by councils in England and explain how families can get breaks from their caring responsibilities). The report considered how accessible and accurate these statements were.

(4) We published a guide for families in 2016 called the “Accessing Public Services Toolkit”. The Toolkit describes some of the common problems families face in dealing with councils and the NHS and suggests ways of solving those problems. A second edition was published in 2017, along with a separate version for families in Scotland. We’ve developed an ongoing programme of workshops across the U.K. to share the Toolkit with parent groups.

(5) In 2017, the student volunteers at Leeds interviewed a small number of families who had applied for a disabled facilities grant to pay for home adaptations. We published a report called “Disabled Children and the Cost Effectiveness of Home Adaptations and Disabled Facilities Grants”, which considered the benefits of investing in these adaptations, including cost savings and improvements in families’ well-being. The report was launched at a conference at the University of Leeds on 12 July 2017 and resulted in meetings with senior members of Leeds City Council, the NHS Leeds Clinical Commissioning Group Partnership and Foundations (the national body for Home Improvement Agencies), along with an article in the Guardian newspaper.

(6) On 12 July 2017, the Project Team also launched a research report called “Local Authority Home to School Online Transport Policies: Accessibility and Accuracy”. This report explains how difficult it is for families to find accurate information about school transport on council websites and how some transport policies are more restrictive than they should be. As a result of the report, the team met with representatives from the Department of Education and worked with the charity, Contact, on their inquiry into school transport, including giving evidence to a select committee at Parliament. The Department for Education has decided to review its guidance for councils on school transport and it is planning to produce an accessible template for council websites, so that school transport information is more easily available to families. The team has been asked to share its research data with the Department to help with this work.

(7) As a result of our casework, the Welsh Government has agreed to make its guidance on continence products more clear, so that families are no longer told that they can only have a maximum of 4 products a day.

(8) We’ve helped families in England and Wales get the services they need – and persuaded councils to change their policies so that other families aren’t disadvantaged. We’ve built on our casework by publishing parent guides, for example on school transport for England and Wales, so that we can share the lessons we’ve learned with many more families. We’ve also published a series of template letters and factsheets for parents to use.

Longer term impact of our research

We know that our work with families helps them to develop the knowledge, confidence and skills they need to get support:

• “Thank you for all your help and support. I don’t think I would have got anywhere without it.”
• “We appreciate the continued support to empower us to go through this process.”
• “I really do appreciate your support. I hadn’t realised there was so much info available to research.”

We will continue to support families and draw on their experiences to help us plan our research and publish resources which help other families in similar situations.

In 2018, our student volunteers will look at three research topics – how difficult it is to apply for a disabled facilities grant, how well the direct payments system works for disabled people and what social care charges disabled people have to pay for their care costs.

We also want to investigate how policies and practices within councils and the NHS can sometimes make it more difficult for families to get the support that they’re entitled to. We’re developing a detailed research plan, which will involve working with councils and the NHS to explore why these barriers exist and what can be done to remove them. We hope to get grant funding in 2018 for this important study, so that we can help to introduce changes within these organisations which will make it easier for more families to get the support they need.

Borrow fiction from our BorrowBox library

BorrowBox is great new service we offer that means you can now borrow ebooks and audiobooks from us. You can read or listen to books using the BorrowBox app on your smartphone or tablet or from your computer on their website. Last month we featured some non-fiction books available to borrow from our BorrowBox library. This month we’re featuring two of the fiction books you can borrow from us.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon

Winner of:

  • Los Angeles Times Book Prize 2003
  • Commonwealth Writers’ Prize Best Book Award and Best First Book Award 2004
  • Whitbread Book of the Year Award 2003
  • Whitbread Novel Award 2003

“Christopher John Francis Boone knows all the countries of the world and their capitals and every prime number up to 7,057. He relates well to animals but has no understanding of human emotions. He cannot stand to be touched. And he detests the colour yellow.

Although gifted with a superbly logical brain, for fifteen-year-old Christopher everyday interactions and admonishments have little meaning. He lives on patterns, rules, and a diagram kept in his pocket. Then one day, a neighbour’s dog, Wellington, is killed and his carefully constructive universe is threatened. Christopher sets out to solve the murder in the style of his favourite (logical) detective, Sherlock Holmes. What follows makes for a novel that is funny, poignant and fascinating in its portrayal of a person whose curse and blessing are a mind that perceives the world entirely literally”

Borrow it as an ebook

The Wreck-It RaceThe Wreck-It Race by Sir Chris Hoy

Audiobook read by Sir Chris Hoy

“A new coach is needed – but what can a wheelchair basketball champion teach Fergus and friends about cycling?

Fergus is sure their new coach is going to be his ultimate hero, cycle champ ‘Spokes’ Sullivan, so when Grandpa introduces Charlotte Campbell, the children are all less than impressed. Charlie is the successful captain of the Paralympic wheelchair basketball team and has some interesting training methods. She gets the team doing yoga and wheelbarrow races, and enters them in the Wreck-It Run, a charity race where everyone creates their own adapted bikes from parts and must compete in pairs. Fergus is sure Charlie is off her rocker – how will this help them get faster for the International time trials?”

Borrow it as an audiobook

Find out more about BorrowBox on our library pages or email our librarian Jan at janetp@cerebra.org.uk.

Overcoming sleep terrors

In this article we take a look at what sleep terrors are, give advice on how to overcome them and explain how our Sleep Service helped Rachel and her mum.

Like any other ten year old, Rachel was desperate to have a sleep over at her friend’s house. However, Rachel has autism and the anxiety she experiences meant that she felt unable to sleep without her mum in the bed with her. She had never managed a full night in bed by herself.

Her mum, Helen, was also concerned about Rachel’s screaming episodes during the night when Rachel would run around the house, appearing terrified and screaming, but unaware of her surroundings. Her GP explained to Helen that these were sleep terrors (sometimes called night terrors) and were likely to be just a stage that Rachel was going through.

Rachel’s sleep terrors sometimes happened twice during the night and Helen was worried about Rachel’s quality of sleep as well as the disruption caused to the whole family. Needing advice and support Helen contacted Cerebra’s Sleep Service.

One of our Sleep Practitioners, Pattie, gave Helen some information and advice on sleep terrors.

If your child is experiencing sleep terrors, it is important to seek medical advice to confirm the diagnosis and to rule out any other causes for the behaviour.

What are sleep terrors?

Sleep terrors are episodes that can that occur when a person is in a deep stage of sleep – usually within the first few hours of going to sleep. NHS guidance says that they most commonly occur between the ages of 3 and 8, but that a child’s developmental age may also need to be taken into account. When experiencing a night terror a child may:

  • Appear frightened
  • Scream
  • Cry
  • Thrash around
  • Appear confused
  • Not respond to the parent / carer or push them away

It’s important to be aware that although the child may seem agitated, they are likely to be unaware of this event and probably won’t have any memory of it in the morning. It’s more distressing for the person who witnesses it. Episodes usually last less than 15 minutes but in younger children, or in those with developmental delay, they may last quite a bit longer.

Some things that may make sleep terrors worse:

  • Changes in sleep patterns
  • Infections/ fever
  • Anxiety/ stress
  • Inadequate sleep
  • Medications that causes certain changes in sleep
  • Caffeine
  • Sleeping with a full bladder
  • Noise and light
  • Sleeping in a different environment
  • Sleep-disordered breathing
  • They may occur more frequently in certain conditions, for example Tourette Syndrome
  • Family history of night terrors or sleepwalking

Suggestions which can help you to manage sleep terrors:

  • Keep bed and wake times consistent
  •  Sleep deprivation can make it worse, so ensure that other sleep problems are managed where possible
  •  Ensure your child is in a safe environment
  •  Inform other caregivers e.g. if your child attends respite or sleepovers etc
  •  Avoid stimulants e.g. caffeine
  •  Avoid waking your child up during an episode as this can prolong a night terror or cause agitation
    If your child leaves the bed then gently guide them back to bed
  • Avoid comforting or other interference as this can also prolong the episode
  • Avoid discussing it with your child the next day as this may cause anxiety, and possibly more disturbed sleep
  • If the episodes happen at a predicated time each night, you could try scheduled waking. This is where you wake the child up 15 minutes before the episode occurs for a few nights (or more in some cases) and then let them go back to sleep and this can often break the cycle.

How did Helen and Rachel get on?

Since Rachel and her mum were also keen for Rachel to be more independent at night-time, Pattie also advised them on how to implement gradual withdrawal. This is a method which involves gradually increasing the distance between parent and child over a period of time. In this case, Helen used a camp bed and set this up in Rachel’s room. Every few days Helen moved this gradually a bit further away from Rachel’s bed until she was out of the room.

She also worked hard to ensure Rachel was calm at bedtime with a relaxing routine as well as keeping the wake times consistent each day (including weekends). You might find some tips in our Anxiety Guide useful.

After two months, Rachel’s sleep terrors had reduced considerably, and Helen got in touch to say how pleased she was that Rachel had managed to sleep over at her friend’s house for the night. Rachel also called Pattie first thing the following morning, as she had been so happy that she had managed to do it!

If you’d like some advice on managing sleep terrors, or other sleep issues, don’t hesitate to get in touch with us.

BorrowBox is here!

We are so pleased to offer a new service in our library.  You can now borrow ebooks and audiobooks from us with BorrowBox. You can read or listen to books using the BorrowBox app on your smartphone or tablet or from your computer on their website.

Here are a couple of the books you can borrow.

The Out-of-Sync Child by Carol Kranowitz

The Out-of-Sync Child is very popular book in our library and now you can borrow it as an audiobook.

From the Trade Paperback edition:

“Does your child exhibit over-responsivity–or under-responsivity–to touch or movement? A child with SPD may be a “sensory avoider,” withdrawing from touch, refusing to wear certain clothing, avoiding active games–or he may be a “sensory disregarder,” needing a jump start to get moving.

Over-responsivity–or under-responsivity–to sounds, sights taste, or smell? She may cover her ears or eyes, be a picky eater, or seem oblivious to sensory cues. Cravings for sensation? The “sensory craver” never gets enough of certain sensations, e.g., messy play, spicy food, noisy action, and perpetual movement. Poor sensory discrimination? She may not sense the difference between objects or experiences–unaware of what she’s holding unless she looks, and unable to sense when she’s falling or how to catch herself.

Unusually high or low activity level? The child may be constantly on the go–wearing out everyone around him–or move slowly and tire easily, showing little interest in the world. Problems with posture or motor coordination? He may slouch, move awkwardly, seem careless or accident-prone.

These are often the first clues to Sensory Processing Disorder–a common but frequently misdiagnosed problem in which the central nervous system misinterprets messages from the senses. The Out-of-Sync Child offers comprehensive, clear information for parents and professionals–and a drug-free treatment approach for children.”

Mindful Parenting for ADHD: A Guide to Cultivating Calm, Reducing Stress, and Helping Children Thrive by Mark Bertin

From the Trade Paperback edition:

“Written by a pediatrician and based in proven-effective mindfulness techniques, this book will help you and your child with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) keep calm, flexible, and in control.

If you are a parent of a child with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), you probably face many unique daily challenges. Kids with ADHD are often inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive, since ADHD affects all of self-management and self-regulation. As a result, you might become chronically frustrated or stressed out, which makes caring for ADHD that much harder. In this book, a developmental pediatrician presents a proven-effective program for helping both you and your child with ADHD stay cool and collected while remaining flexible, resilient, and mindful.

Bertin addresses the various symptoms of ADHD using non-technical language and a user-friendly format. In addition, he offers guidelines to help you assess your child’s strengths and weaknesses, create plans for building skills and managing specific challenges, lower stress levels for both yourself and your child, communicate effectively, and cultivate balance and harmony at home and at school.

If you are a parent, caregiver, or mental health professional, this book provides a valuable guide.”


Full details of how BorrowBox works and how to sign up are on our BorrowBox page. You can also view the full library of ebooks and audiobooks here.

Independence for Myles with our Oxygem

Our creative team of designers at our Innovation Centre and our Oxygem recently helped Myles to become more independent. Myles’ mum Vickie tells us more – and take a look at  the great video at the end!

We are a family of 4 – me, my husband Neil, Noah who is 6 and Myles who is 2 1/2.  Myles was born a seemingly healthy full term baby boy. But he struggled to thrive and was always catching viruses, we seemed to be at the doctors every week. He developed pneumonia at the age of 5 months and was hospitalised. We were sent home with medication but over the next few weeks he deteriorated and ended up being taken into intensive care where he required ventilation.

It was thought that Myles would be able to be weaned off oxygen as he had suspected broncholitis. After weeks in hospital trying to wean him it was obvious something else was going on with his lungs. For the rest of the year he was in and out of hospital having investigations and surgery. They decided to do a gastrostemy for additional nutrition as growth was a vital part of his care. After a lung biopsy and genetic screen he was diagnosed with Surfactant Protein Deficiency Type C. This is a condition which results in the lack of tension in the alveolar sack minimising the surface area for gas exchange.

Myles has been dependent on oxygen ever since meaning he always has to have an adult with him to carry the oxygen cylinder. Myles has done amazingly well hitting his milestones albeit a little delayed. He has started going to nursery just a few hours a week so I wanted to try and find something that would give him a little more independence.

I spoke to our care teams but there didn’t seem to be anything available through the NHS or privately. I even started to look at portable concentrators as these are much lighter but unfortunately these work on a pulse flow rate. A child’s breath intake is not strong enough to trigger the release of oxygen so these are only suitable for adults.

Through searching the internet I came across Cerebra and your Innovation Centre. The Oxygem looked perfect for Myles as he’s strong enough to push a trolley and it would enable him to have a level of independence. We were so overwhelmed he was accepted to receive one of the prototypes. He took to it straight away and now enjoys walking round the park with it and walking on the school run.

Myles’ condition means that as he grows he will hopefully be able to have stints off the oxygen. But it’s during levels of activity that he really needs more. The Oxygem enables him to move around with the cylinder when he needs it most. He is due to start school September 2019 and I think the Oxygem will really allow him to integrate with his peers. The fact that the handles can be changed for longer ones as he grows is brilliant.

Watch Myles in action

Can our Innovation Centre help your family? Don’t hesitate to get in touch for a chat.

Parents, researchers and charities join forces to create new resource for parents of children with learning disabilities.

The University of Warwick, Mencap, Cerebra, and the Challenging Behaviour Foundation have teamed up with parents of children with learning disabilities to produce a new Parent’s Guide on improving the well-being of young children with learning disabilities. The guide is being launched today (25th May) in Belfast and you can download the the booklet here.

Research has shown that young people with learning disabilities face more barriers to achieving well-being than children without a learning disability, but also that there are practical steps and strategies which parents can take to change this.

Combining the practical wisdom of parents with insight from the University of Warwick’s twenty years of research into the wellbeing of families of children with a learning disability, the new guide presents hints and tips, backed up by research, for parents to use in their family lives to promote the well-being of their children and to develop positive family relationships.

The Parent’s Guide has been created to help parents support the well-being of children from 0 – 5.   It offers suggestions on ways to build and support warm, positive family relationships, and also includes a chapter on activities parents and siblings can do to support the development of a child with learning disabilities.

Each chapter includes advice from parents, suggested activities, and space for personal notes and reflection.

Parents invited to give feedback on the guide befor its launch said:

  • “The tone of the booklet is really reassuring, and easy to understand. It makes a nice change from the booklets we usually read that are full of jargon.”
  • “The best bit of the booklet for me is hearing about other people’s experiences and coping mechanisms. It makes me realise that we aren’t alone. I just wish we had had something like this when our son was born.”
  • “Every chapter is so relatable, and it’s so useful to read about all of the activities.”
  • “I want to complete the reflection activity and review this to see if I did set some time aside for myself. I think that putting it somewhere I can see it, like on the fridge, will remind me to do it.”
  • “I think that this booklet is amazing information for parents to know.”

The guide has been written by Dr Samantha Flynn, Dr Vaso Totsika and Professor Richard Hastings of the University of Warwick’s Centre for Educational Development, Appraisal and Research (CEDAR), in collaboration with family carers of children with learning disabilities, Margaret Kelly and Joanne Sweeney of Mencap Northern Ireland, Tracy Elliott from Cerebra and Viv Cooper OBE and Jacqui Shurlock from The Challenging Behaviour Foundation.

The guide is supported by a policy briefing which you can download here:

Policy briefing

Dr Totsika said:

“We wanted to share what CEDAR has found out about the best ways parents can  support the well-being of children with learning disabilities in a format that was easy to understand and also easy for parents to put into practice.

“We are very grateful to the parents who worked with us on the Guide to put our research into context, and share their own experiences of supporting a child with learning disabilities through examples from their own lives.”

Margaret Kelly, Director of Mencap NI said:

“We are delighted to have worked alongside the University of Warwick, parents and various organisations to produce this wonderful guide to help support parents of young children with a learning disability.

“There are currently 5,000 children with a learning disability under the age of seven in Northern Ireland and we believe every young child with a learning disability should have access to early intervention services that support their development from birth.

“At Mencap, we are committed to ensuring children with a learning disability and their families have access to effective early intervention services and approaches and we believe this book will be of support to so many parents of children with a learning disability.”

Tracy Elliott, Head of Research and Information at Cerebra, said:

“Cerebra is the charity that works with families who include children with brain conditions.  By listening to families we know that one of their key concerns is for their child’s well-being, but they often question what well-being means for their child and how can they promote it.

“Using research evidence, this booklet will answer key questions families have and give them ideas of what they can do to enhance their child’s and family’s well-being.”

Jacqui Shurlock, Children and Young people’s lead at the Challenging Behaviour Foundation said:

“The Challenging Behaviour Foundation supports families of children and adults with severe learning disabilities whose behaviours are described as challenging.

“Families tell us that it is really difficult to get good information or support when children are small and that sometimes professionals dismiss their questions or concerns about how to manage day to day life.  Families want the right information at the right time, presented in the right way.  This booklet is a real step in the right direction.  We hope families will find it useful and we very much hope to see other researchers following this example.”

Development of this booklet was supported by an award from the ESRC Impact Acceleration Award of the University of Warwick (ES/M500434/1).

The research that primarily fed into this booklet has been funded by a grant from the Baily Thomas Charitable Fund (TRUST/VC/AC/SG/4016-6851). Some of the previous research that was included in the booklet had been supported by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Mencap, Cerebra, and the Challenging Behaviour Foundation have provided support for a number of the studies included in this booklet, both financial and collaborative.

 

 

How to look after yourself

We know from research that parents of children with a learning disability can be twice as likely to experience high stress levels as do other parents. High levels of stress can have a negative impact on your well-being.

In this article we look at some ways that you can look after your own well-being. Not all of these will work for everyone, and there could be some trial and error involved while you find what works best for you. This article is taken from A Parent’s Guide: Improving the well-being of young children with learning disabilities.

We know that the simplest things, like eating healthily, getting enough rest, and exercising regularly can be the most difficult when caring for a child with a learning disability. But it is important to do these things to look after yourself. Most parents we spoke to said that sleep was the most difficult thing for them to do. Addressing your child’s sleep issues will help you get a better night’s sleep. You might need some help from others when you try to deal with your child’s sleep difficulties. Cerebra have a team of sleep practitioners who can offer help and advice about children’s sleep problems.

You could try to make some small changes that can benefit your own and your child’s well-being. Parents and practitioners advised that some examples of small changes are:

  • Putting on some music that you enjoy and sing or dance to it
  • Thinking about short journeys that you can walk, instead of driving
  • Thinking back to the things that you most enjoyed before you had children (e.g., playing sports, going out with friends, reading), and trying to think of a creative way to fit some of them back into your life.
  • Trying something new that you’ve wanted to do for a while. The parents we spoke to said that this could be a good way to meet new people as well.
  • Find someone who can support you to have short and regular breaks to do something you enjoy (e.g., having a quiet cup of tea, going for a walk.

It might help to talk to other parents who are going through a similar experience to you. You could join a support group for parents of children with disabilities. Some of the parents we spoke to said that they were members of online support groups and parent groups on social media; they said that these were really good to get support from people who are similar to them.

We know from research that using mindfulness and meditation, can help to improve parental well-being. Mindfulness might also help us to make practical changes after practising it for some time as we are less likely to be reactive in stressful situations. There are courses available on mindfulness and these might help to get you started. Some of the parents we spoke to said that parents could use mindfulness or meditation apps on their phones, and this might be easier to do than going on a course.

Parents tell us that trying to take regular breaks from your caring responsibilities to look after your own health and well-being is also very important. You could ask family and friends to help out, or ask your Local Council for guidance about respite support. Parents we spoke to said that help is out there, and taking some time to find it can give you the time in future that you need to look after yourself. All parents said that time was the best resource when they are trying to look after themselves.

Trying to make time for yourself might feel impossible, especially when your child is young or has complex needs. But looking after yourself is not time out from caring for your child. It is an investment that supports you, your child, and your unique relationship.

Some parents that we spoke to said that even really short breaks can help them to look after themselves. This might be more manageable for some families.

We spoke to parents of children with a learning disability about some other ways that they look after their own well-being:

“I try to see a friend one evening a week, and get caught up with them. There are nights where I sit down and I am too tired, and don’t want to go, but it is worth it for that bit of sanity and get out and be with my friends and catch up.” A mother of a two and a half year old boy with Down’s syndrome
“I enjoy playing football, and that’s my own time a few nights a week if I’m not working. I find it hard to find time sometimes, because I work full-time.” A father of a three year old boy with a learning disability
“It’s not easy to fit everything in. We have to roll with it, and take time for ourselves whenever we can. We usually take time when we have dropped our daughter off at nursery to get a bite to eat, or spend some time with the other parents [of children with learning disabilities].” A mother of a three year old girl with a learning disability

 

‘A Parent’s Guide: Improving the well-being of young children with learning disabilities’ is a collaboration between the University of Warwick, Cerebra, Mencap, the Challenging Behaviour Foundation, and parents of children with learning disabilities.

The booklet has been created to help parents support the well-being of their young child with a learning disability (aged 0 to 5), but parents of older children may also find it useful.The guide contains helpful information on:

  • Chapter 1: How to look after yourself (Parental well-being)
  • Chapter 2: Organising family life
  • Chapter 3: Spending time together
  • Chapter 4: Activities to do with my child with a learning disability at home and outside

BorrowBox is coming soon!

We’re delighted to announce that BorrowBox is coming soon to our library. With BorrowBox you’ll be able to borrow e-books and e-audiobooks from Cerebra 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. .

Recognised as the No1 library download platform in the world, BorrowBox is the brainchild of Bolinda Digital. Unique because it will enable members of our library to download and borrow eBooks and e-Audiobooks via digital  loans. BorrowBox is the only app of its kind in the world with an inbuilt eBook reader and eAudiobook player.

On your phone, on your iPad, on your home computer, BorrowBox means that the doors to our library will never close – you can access books around the clock. BorrowBox can be used online and with Apple iOS and Google Android devices. You’ll be able to download ebooks directly from the the Cerebra library or from the BorrowBox app.

We are so pleased to be able to offer a new service as part of our library. With BorrowBox we are able to offer e-books as well as books. These are going to appeal to a different group of people who prefer reading books on their tablet, PC or kindle. Anyone who is a member of Cerebra can join our BorrowBox library, you don’t have to be a member of the postal library. We are pleased to be giving parents more ways of getting information about neurological conditions. As well as e-books for parents, we are also going to have a selection of e-audio books for children. This is really exciting as we haven’t been able to offer books that children can listen to before. Jan Pugh – Cerebra Librarian

Keep an eye open for more information about how you will be able to use this wonderful resource, completely free of charge.

 

 

Improving the well-being of young children with learning disabilities: A Parent’s Guide

We’re looking for people to take a look at a brand new booklet on improving the well-being of young children with learning disabilities, and to give their feedback.

Researchers at the University of Warwick are working with a group of parents of children with learning disabilities, Mencap, the Challenging Behaviour Foundation, and Cerebra to write a guide for parents to support the well-being of young children with learning disabilities.

The booklet combines what we know from research with parents’ personal experiences. The family activities within the booklet have been shown to be important for supporting the well-being of children with learning disabilities.

There are four chapters in the booklet, and parents are able to use the booklet flexibly depending on what information they want to know at the time. The chapters are about:

  • How to look after yourself
  • Organising family life
  • Spending time together
  • Activities to do with my child with a learning disability at home and outside

You can download a copy of the booklet for free here.

Please tell us what you think about it here.

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