Category Archives: Practical Help

Get a good night’s sleep with help from our library

Join our librarian Jan (and teddy) as she talks through the different books and sensory equipment we have in our library that could help your child to sleep.

Books on sleep

  • L1676 – Treating Sleep Disorders: principle and practice of behaviour sleep medicine by M L Perlis
  • L6107 – The New Baby and Toddler Sleep Programme by John Pearce
  • L6315 & L6531 – Solving Children’s Sleep Problems: a step by step guide for parents by Lyn Quine
  • L6324 – Teach Your Child to Sleep: solving sleep problems from newborn through childhood by Millpond Children’s Sleep Clinic
  • L6325 – Sleep Disturbances in Children and Adolescents with Disorders of Development: its significance and management by Gregory Stores
  • L6367 – A Clinical Guide to Pediatric Sleep Diagnosis and Management of Sleep Problems by Jodi A Mindell
  • L6392 – Sleep Difficulties and the Autism Spectrum Disorder by Kenneth Aitken
  • L6605 & L6606 – Sleep Better: a guide to improving sleep for children with special needs by Mark Durrant
  • L6694 – The Gentle Sleep Book: a guide for calm babies toddlers and pre-schoolers by Sarah Ockwell- Smith
  • L6730 – Sleep? What’s That? The incidence and impact of sleep problems in families of disabled children by Gillian Cowdell
  • L6740 – Why We Sleep? The new science of sleep and dreams by Matthew Walker

Relaxing sensory toys

Fibre optics

The most widely accessible of all the sensory equipment. Consists of a light box and 100 two metre fibre optic strands. Features LED lights and plastic ‘sparkle’ effect strands with an automatic colour change cycle. Safe to
handle for children of all ages. Ideal for holding the child’s attention and good for those with sensory avoidance.

Mood egg

New in the library, this robust plastic egg is 42cm high and can be used indoors or outdoors. It is operated using a remote control. You can choose individual colours or a colour changing cycle. It comes with a recharging
station, each charge of 6 hours provides 8 hours of light

NB includes a flashing mode not suitable for those with photosensitive epilepsy.

Relaxation Sensory Kit

Contains all you need to create a calming environment. Includes weighted dolphin neck wrap, microwave heatable animal, aromatherapy diffuser with lavender oil, kid’s relaxation CDs, sand timer and other calming
tactile items.

Sensory in a Suitcase

Our most popular item. The suitcase contains a wealth of sensory equipment to relax and stimulate. Can be used for therapy, education and play activities. Contents include: fibre optic lights; UV torch and UV reactive items; Space Projector; aromatherapy diffuser and oils; mood pod projector with coloured lights;
natural sounds CDs and a variety of sound and tactile items. Most, but not all, also have a pin spot lamp and mirror ball.

To borrow any of these books or sensory toys contact Jan on janetp@cerebra.org.uk or 01267 244203.

Sleep – tips and techniques

We are launching a new resource to help families who have a child with a brain condition to get a good night’s sleep. Sleep – tips and techniques for families who have a child with a brain condition explains techniques to help with the ten most common sleep problems including refusing to go to bed; not wanting to sleep alone, waking up during the night, waking up early.

We all need good quality sleep in order to learn new information, pay attention to the world around us, and store memories effectively. Sleep influences our mood, how hungry or full we feel, as well as fundamental biological processes such as cell development. Given the wide-reaching impact of sleep, it is not surprising that poor sleep has a significant negative impact on people.

Unfortunately, short and disrupted sleep is common in children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Children with autism, intellectual disabilities and a variety of rare genetic syndromes are at greatest risk of experiencing the negative consequences of poor sleep. What’s more, these children may already find learning new information, maintaining attention and regulating mood and behaviour very difficult; compromised sleep in these groups is therefore a huge concern.

Our Sleep Service helps families to get a better night’s sleep through one-to-one support, sleep workshops and sleep information resources.

The new booklet, Sleep – tips and techniques introduces and explains several different techniques that may help a child’s sleep and gives lots of illustrated hints and tips for putting them into practice. It includes 10 topics:

  • Bedtime routine
  • Calming time before sleep
  • A good sleep environment
  • Positive sleep associations
  • Using a comforting object
  • Gradual withdrawal from the bedroom
  • Moving bedtime backwards
  • Moving bedtime forwards
  • Creating a rewards system
  • Reducing daytime naps

Download booklet (PDF)

The information in the booklet is based on research at the Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders at the University of Birmingham. Through the Sleep Project they are leading cutting edge research to understand the different types and causes of sleep problems in children with neurodevelopmental disorders, identifying how poor sleep impacts on children and their families and trialling new interventions to reduce sleep problems more effectively.

The Sleep Tips guide can be downloaded free of charge. You can also access one-to-one support, find out about sleep workshops as well as download our comprehensive Sleep Guide.

We’ve planned a week of activity on social media around the launch of the new Sleep Tips booklet. Cerebra Sleep Week runs from 17th – 23rd September and will include lots of advice and support for families who may be struggling with lack of sleep. #Cerebrasleepweek.

What impact do sleep problems have?

Although the odd night of poor sleep may not affect daily abilities, persistent sleep problems can have a huge impact on individuals with and without intellectual disability and their friends, families, colleagues and carers. For all individuals, lack of sleep is associated with problems with mood, learning, memory and behaviour.

This article is taken from our Sleep Guide which you can download for free on our website.

Learning

Importantly, poor sleep affects motivation and concentration, which means that individuals who are experiencing sleep problems may make more errors at school/work, particularly on repetitive tasks. This means that if your child is struggling on ‘easier’ tasks at school (which are often repeated until they are ready to move on to harder tasks) it is worth speaking to their teacher, who may be under the impression that they are struggling because of their intellectual disability, rather than the sleep issues.

Sleep is also vital to a process called memory consolidation, where memories from the day (e.g. memory of that is learned at school) are strengthened. If sleep is disrupted these memories may not be stored properly, making it harder for children to use what they have already learned during the next day at school.

Challenging behaviour

Poor sleep may also reduce an individual’s ability to cope with changes in their routine. You may notice that your child shows more challenging behaviour (for example, self-injury, aggression, destruction) when they have not slept well the night before. This is common in children with intellectual disability and also in children and adults of typical development! We are all more irritable when we have not slept well and are therefore more likely to show behaviours which indicate that we would like certain tasks to end or situations to change.

Since individuals with intellectual disability may have limited ways to communicate their feelings and preferences, challenging behaviour can be a very effective way of indicating needs or desires (for example for a task to be taken away). It is natural for parents/carers/teachers to want to respond quickly to the challenging behaviour, which means that it is more likely to occur again the next time they want a task to be removed. For more information on mutual reinforcement of challenging behaviour, see “Parent response to waking” on page 10 of our Sleep Guide, and also our factsheet on Managing Challenging Behaviour.

Parents of children with intellectual disability therefore have a lot to do: comforting children with sleeping problems, acting as an advocate for their child’s learning and health, and managing challenging behaviour. Often parents and family members experience a loss of sleep themselves, which can make managing these aspects of parenting more difficult and may even contribute to low mood and impaired concentration.

It may feel as though your child’s sleep problem is out of your control or that you do not have he time/resources to invest in fixing it. However, after thorough assessment, there are some simple intervention strategies available in Part Three of the guide which can help to improve sleep.

You can download our Sleep Guide and our new tips and techniques booklet free of charge from our website. If you’d like some individual advice on tackling your child’s sleep issues please get in touch with our Sleep Team.

My child just won’t go to sleep

Small girl waking her parents early in the morning.This article takes a look at what you can do if your child just won’t go to sleep. It’s taken from our Sleep Guide which is available to download for free.

What should I do when my child just will not go to sleep?

Often settling problems can be caused by a lack of bedtime routine or perhaps the bedroom being associated with activities other than sleep. However, even after establishing a calming bedtime routine, it may be that your child does not want to go to sleep and cries out to you. This may be distressing for you as a parent to hear and your natural reaction may be to go back into your child’s bedroom.

As described in Part One of the Sleep Guide, this may be contributing to the problem, and so the next step for intervention would be to stop reinforcing the settling problem. This may require ‘ignoring’ your child’s cries, which is known as extinction. However, this can be very difficult for parents and children, so graduated extinction is recommended.

Agree a set amount of time (e.g. 2 minutes) that you will allow your child to cry for, before briefly checking on them.

  1. When your child has been crying for the 2 minutes, go in and check them. This checking should only be to reassure yourself that the child is alright and to tell them to go back to bed. When you check on them, do not offer physical interaction, music, or any other aspect of the bedtime routine.
  2. Leave the room and wait the agreed time before repeating the checking procedure.
  3. You may have to repeat this many times before your child eventually falls asleep, so it’s a good idea to start on Friday night or another evening where no one has school or work the next day.
  4. The next night, gradually increase the amount of time you allow before checking on your child (e.g. from 2 minutes to 4 minutes), and continue to keep the checking procedure brief.
  5. Repeat this until the child’s crying at settling reduces.

If the suggested times here are too long, try just waiting for one minute before checking and then gradually increase the time by 30 seconds each night. Eventually your child will learn to settle themselves to sleep without you there

If you’d like some individual advice on introducing this technique please get in touch with our Sleep Team. 

Jonas enjoys sensory toys from our library

Jonas with fibre optics

Jonas with fibre optics

Jonas’ parents recently contacted our postal lending library to borrow some sensory lights. Mum Jolanta and dad Andrej told us their story.

”Jonas is a 2 year old boy who has CDKL5 disorder. CDKL5 is a rare x- linked genetic disorder that results in early onset, difficult to control seizures, low muscle tone and severe neurodevelopmental impairment.

Most children with CDKL5 do not walk, almost all do not talk and they have a range of other symptoms. Sadly Jonas has a cortical visual impairment (CVI) and can’t hold his head up yet. Unfortunately there is no treatment  for his condition.

As a parents we are looking for all available options how we can help our son to enjoy life as much as possible. At the same time we want to improve his vision and that is a reason that we decided to try to borrow the fibre optics from Cerebra library.

And it was amazing! Jonas enjoyed fibre optics so much and it helped his therapy to stimulate his vision”.

You can find out more information about our postal lending library on our website or by emailing janetp@cerebra.org.uk.

 

Travel insurance covering children with disabilities

travel insurance covering children with disabilities

At this time of year, one of the questions coming in to our helpline is about travel insurance that will cover children with pre-existing conditions. Many people have travel cover potentially included with a service they already use, such as car insurance, a membership subscription or a bank account, but they have looked in the small print and found that pre-existing conditions are excluded.

Should you be in this position and wish to know where to find an insurer that will provide cover, the list below is a place to start. Some of these companies only cover for certain conditions.

Listing these companies does not imply that Cerebra recommend any of them, only that we know they are there. Please make sure you check that they are suitable for your needs.

Insurance companies

A holiday advice organisation that may know of other insurers is Tourism for All.

Other things worth thinking about before travelling

Government advice about travel with disabilities, which includes insurance, booking, taking medication abroad, law, access, finance, airports and so on.

For travel in the UK, the National Key Scheme for access to toilets for people with disabilities (not all toilets are kept locked, but for those that are), http://nks.directenquiries.com/nks/page.aspx?pageid=10&tab=National+Key+Scheme&level=2 and

For travel in Europe, a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) is needed. These cards should be free of charge but they go out of date, so if you already have one it is worth checking that it will still be valid when you travel.  Further details: http://www.moneysavingexpert.com/travel/free-ehic-card.


This article was first written in June 2015. Updated August 2018.

Delivering legal rights through practical problem solving

In this article we explain our Legal Entitlements and Problem-Solving (LEaP) Project with the Centre for Law and Social Justice, the School of Law, University of Leeds.

Why we started the Project

Disabled children and their families sometimes need extra support in order to have a normal everyday life – for example, help with bathing or eating, moving around or communicating. Local councils and the NHS have legal duties to meet these needs by providing support, such as someone to help with personal care at home, specialist equipment, adaptations, short breaks or therapy services. However, we know from our work with families that, in practice, parents often struggle to get the right support for their children and a lack of support can harm the health and well-being of the whole family.

The LEaP Project aims to find out why families struggle to get the help that they’re legally entitled to and what can be done to change things. We want to learn more about the problems families face, so that we can work out ways of overcoming them and helping families to get the support they need. The Project is led by Luke Clements, Professor of Law and Social Justice at the University of Leeds.

What we do

We invite families to tell us about the problems they face in getting the support they need. With expert support from the team at the University, we provide legal information and advice to help families overcome those difficulties. We help families to understand what their legal rights are and what they can do if they fail to get the support they need. We also use the information we get from individual cases to write template letters, factsheets and guides, which can help other families in similar situations.

When we see from our casework that several families are having similar problems, we ask our student volunteers at Leeds to study this problem in more detail (often by doing a survey) and then produce a report with ideas about how policy and practice can be changed to avoid these problems in the future. Past projects have looked at short breaks, school transport and disabled facilities grants.

Then we use the knowledge gained from our advice casework and student-led projects to improve our understanding of why these legal problems occur and to work out practical ways of overcoming them. We want to find out which problem-solving techniques help families to cope better with the challenges they face and how councils and the NHS can change the way they work.

What we’ve achieved so far

(1) We’ve attracted funding from the Economic and Social Research Council and from Leeds University, which has enabled us to fund a PhD student, develop our Problem-Solving Toolkit (see below) and fund a research assistant post at the University.

(2) In 2013 and 2014, we published compilations of our advice letters (the ‘Digests of Opinions’) to help other families in similar situations.

(3) In 2016, we published a report about ‘short breaks statements’ (these statements are published by councils in England and explain how families can get breaks from their caring responsibilities). The report considered how accessible and accurate these statements were.

(4) We published a guide for families in 2016 called the “Accessing Public Services Toolkit”. The Toolkit describes some of the common problems families face in dealing with councils and the NHS and suggests ways of solving those problems. A second edition was published in 2017, along with a separate version for families in Scotland. We’ve developed an ongoing programme of workshops across the U.K. to share the Toolkit with parent groups.

(5) In 2017, the student volunteers at Leeds interviewed a small number of families who had applied for a disabled facilities grant to pay for home adaptations. We published a report called “Disabled Children and the Cost Effectiveness of Home Adaptations and Disabled Facilities Grants”, which considered the benefits of investing in these adaptations, including cost savings and improvements in families’ well-being. The report was launched at a conference at the University of Leeds on 12 July 2017 and resulted in meetings with senior members of Leeds City Council, the NHS Leeds Clinical Commissioning Group Partnership and Foundations (the national body for Home Improvement Agencies), along with an article in the Guardian newspaper.

(6) On 12 July 2017, the Project Team also launched a research report called “Local Authority Home to School Online Transport Policies: Accessibility and Accuracy”. This report explains how difficult it is for families to find accurate information about school transport on council websites and how some transport policies are more restrictive than they should be. As a result of the report, the team met with representatives from the Department of Education and worked with the charity, Contact, on their inquiry into school transport, including giving evidence to a select committee at Parliament. The Department for Education has decided to review its guidance for councils on school transport and it is planning to produce an accessible template for council websites, so that school transport information is more easily available to families. The team has been asked to share its research data with the Department to help with this work.

(7) As a result of our casework, the Welsh Government has agreed to make its guidance on continence products more clear, so that families are no longer told that they can only have a maximum of 4 products a day.

(8) We’ve helped families in England and Wales get the services they need – and persuaded councils to change their policies so that other families aren’t disadvantaged. We’ve built on our casework by publishing parent guides, for example on school transport for England and Wales, so that we can share the lessons we’ve learned with many more families. We’ve also published a series of template letters and factsheets for parents to use.

Longer term impact of our research

We know that our work with families helps them to develop the knowledge, confidence and skills they need to get support:

• “Thank you for all your help and support. I don’t think I would have got anywhere without it.”
• “We appreciate the continued support to empower us to go through this process.”
• “I really do appreciate your support. I hadn’t realised there was so much info available to research.”

We will continue to support families and draw on their experiences to help us plan our research and publish resources which help other families in similar situations.

In 2018, our student volunteers will look at three research topics – how difficult it is to apply for a disabled facilities grant, how well the direct payments system works for disabled people and what social care charges disabled people have to pay for their care costs.

We also want to investigate how policies and practices within councils and the NHS can sometimes make it more difficult for families to get the support that they’re entitled to. We’re developing a detailed research plan, which will involve working with councils and the NHS to explore why these barriers exist and what can be done to remove them. We hope to get grant funding in 2018 for this important study, so that we can help to introduce changes within these organisations which will make it easier for more families to get the support they need.

Borrow fiction from our BorrowBox library

BorrowBox is great new service we offer that means you can now borrow ebooks and audiobooks from us. You can read or listen to books using the BorrowBox app on your smartphone or tablet or from your computer on their website. Last month we featured some non-fiction books available to borrow from our BorrowBox library. This month we’re featuring two of the fiction books you can borrow from us.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon

Winner of:

  • Los Angeles Times Book Prize 2003
  • Commonwealth Writers’ Prize Best Book Award and Best First Book Award 2004
  • Whitbread Book of the Year Award 2003
  • Whitbread Novel Award 2003

“Christopher John Francis Boone knows all the countries of the world and their capitals and every prime number up to 7,057. He relates well to animals but has no understanding of human emotions. He cannot stand to be touched. And he detests the colour yellow.

Although gifted with a superbly logical brain, for fifteen-year-old Christopher everyday interactions and admonishments have little meaning. He lives on patterns, rules, and a diagram kept in his pocket. Then one day, a neighbour’s dog, Wellington, is killed and his carefully constructive universe is threatened. Christopher sets out to solve the murder in the style of his favourite (logical) detective, Sherlock Holmes. What follows makes for a novel that is funny, poignant and fascinating in its portrayal of a person whose curse and blessing are a mind that perceives the world entirely literally”

Borrow it as an ebook

The Wreck-It RaceThe Wreck-It Race by Sir Chris Hoy

Audiobook read by Sir Chris Hoy

“A new coach is needed – but what can a wheelchair basketball champion teach Fergus and friends about cycling?

Fergus is sure their new coach is going to be his ultimate hero, cycle champ ‘Spokes’ Sullivan, so when Grandpa introduces Charlotte Campbell, the children are all less than impressed. Charlie is the successful captain of the Paralympic wheelchair basketball team and has some interesting training methods. She gets the team doing yoga and wheelbarrow races, and enters them in the Wreck-It Run, a charity race where everyone creates their own adapted bikes from parts and must compete in pairs. Fergus is sure Charlie is off her rocker – how will this help them get faster for the International time trials?”

Borrow it as an audiobook

Find out more about BorrowBox on our library pages or email our librarian Jan at janetp@cerebra.org.uk.

Overcoming sleep terrors

In this article we take a look at what sleep terrors are, give advice on how to overcome them and explain how our Sleep Service helped Rachel and her mum.

Like any other ten year old, Rachel was desperate to have a sleep over at her friend’s house. However, Rachel has autism and the anxiety she experiences meant that she felt unable to sleep without her mum in the bed with her. She had never managed a full night in bed by herself.

Her mum, Helen, was also concerned about Rachel’s screaming episodes during the night when Rachel would run around the house, appearing terrified and screaming, but unaware of her surroundings. Her GP explained to Helen that these were sleep terrors (sometimes called night terrors) and were likely to be just a stage that Rachel was going through.

Rachel’s sleep terrors sometimes happened twice during the night and Helen was worried about Rachel’s quality of sleep as well as the disruption caused to the whole family. Needing advice and support Helen contacted Cerebra’s Sleep Service.

One of our Sleep Practitioners, Pattie, gave Helen some information and advice on sleep terrors.

If your child is experiencing sleep terrors, it is important to seek medical advice to confirm the diagnosis and to rule out any other causes for the behaviour.

What are sleep terrors?

Sleep terrors are episodes that can that occur when a person is in a deep stage of sleep – usually within the first few hours of going to sleep. NHS guidance says that they most commonly occur between the ages of 3 and 8, but that a child’s developmental age may also need to be taken into account. When experiencing a night terror a child may:

  • Appear frightened
  • Scream
  • Cry
  • Thrash around
  • Appear confused
  • Not respond to the parent / carer or push them away

It’s important to be aware that although the child may seem agitated, they are likely to be unaware of this event and probably won’t have any memory of it in the morning. It’s more distressing for the person who witnesses it. Episodes usually last less than 15 minutes but in younger children, or in those with developmental delay, they may last quite a bit longer.

Some things that may make sleep terrors worse:

  • Changes in sleep patterns
  • Infections/ fever
  • Anxiety/ stress
  • Inadequate sleep
  • Medications that causes certain changes in sleep
  • Caffeine
  • Sleeping with a full bladder
  • Noise and light
  • Sleeping in a different environment
  • Sleep-disordered breathing
  • They may occur more frequently in certain conditions, for example Tourette Syndrome
  • Family history of night terrors or sleepwalking

Suggestions which can help you to manage sleep terrors:

  • Keep bed and wake times consistent
  •  Sleep deprivation can make it worse, so ensure that other sleep problems are managed where possible
  •  Ensure your child is in a safe environment
  •  Inform other caregivers e.g. if your child attends respite or sleepovers etc
  •  Avoid stimulants e.g. caffeine
  •  Avoid waking your child up during an episode as this can prolong a night terror or cause agitation
    If your child leaves the bed then gently guide them back to bed
  • Avoid comforting or other interference as this can also prolong the episode
  • Avoid discussing it with your child the next day as this may cause anxiety, and possibly more disturbed sleep
  • If the episodes happen at a predicated time each night, you could try scheduled waking. This is where you wake the child up 15 minutes before the episode occurs for a few nights (or more in some cases) and then let them go back to sleep and this can often break the cycle.

How did Helen and Rachel get on?

Since Rachel and her mum were also keen for Rachel to be more independent at night-time, Pattie also advised them on how to implement gradual withdrawal. This is a method which involves gradually increasing the distance between parent and child over a period of time. In this case, Helen used a camp bed and set this up in Rachel’s room. Every few days Helen moved this gradually a bit further away from Rachel’s bed until she was out of the room.

She also worked hard to ensure Rachel was calm at bedtime with a relaxing routine as well as keeping the wake times consistent each day (including weekends). You might find some tips in our Anxiety Guide useful.

After two months, Rachel’s sleep terrors had reduced considerably, and Helen got in touch to say how pleased she was that Rachel had managed to sleep over at her friend’s house for the night. Rachel also called Pattie first thing the following morning, as she had been so happy that she had managed to do it!

If you’d like some advice on managing sleep terrors, or other sleep issues, don’t hesitate to get in touch with us.

BorrowBox is here!

We are so pleased to offer a new service in our library.  You can now borrow ebooks and audiobooks from us with BorrowBox. You can read or listen to books using the BorrowBox app on your smartphone or tablet or from your computer on their website.

Here are a couple of the books you can borrow.

The Out-of-Sync Child by Carol Kranowitz

The Out-of-Sync Child is very popular book in our library and now you can borrow it as an audiobook.

From the Trade Paperback edition:

“Does your child exhibit over-responsivity–or under-responsivity–to touch or movement? A child with SPD may be a “sensory avoider,” withdrawing from touch, refusing to wear certain clothing, avoiding active games–or he may be a “sensory disregarder,” needing a jump start to get moving.

Over-responsivity–or under-responsivity–to sounds, sights taste, or smell? She may cover her ears or eyes, be a picky eater, or seem oblivious to sensory cues. Cravings for sensation? The “sensory craver” never gets enough of certain sensations, e.g., messy play, spicy food, noisy action, and perpetual movement. Poor sensory discrimination? She may not sense the difference between objects or experiences–unaware of what she’s holding unless she looks, and unable to sense when she’s falling or how to catch herself.

Unusually high or low activity level? The child may be constantly on the go–wearing out everyone around him–or move slowly and tire easily, showing little interest in the world. Problems with posture or motor coordination? He may slouch, move awkwardly, seem careless or accident-prone.

These are often the first clues to Sensory Processing Disorder–a common but frequently misdiagnosed problem in which the central nervous system misinterprets messages from the senses. The Out-of-Sync Child offers comprehensive, clear information for parents and professionals–and a drug-free treatment approach for children.”

Mindful Parenting for ADHD: A Guide to Cultivating Calm, Reducing Stress, and Helping Children Thrive by Mark Bertin

From the Trade Paperback edition:

“Written by a pediatrician and based in proven-effective mindfulness techniques, this book will help you and your child with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) keep calm, flexible, and in control.

If you are a parent of a child with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), you probably face many unique daily challenges. Kids with ADHD are often inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive, since ADHD affects all of self-management and self-regulation. As a result, you might become chronically frustrated or stressed out, which makes caring for ADHD that much harder. In this book, a developmental pediatrician presents a proven-effective program for helping both you and your child with ADHD stay cool and collected while remaining flexible, resilient, and mindful.

Bertin addresses the various symptoms of ADHD using non-technical language and a user-friendly format. In addition, he offers guidelines to help you assess your child’s strengths and weaknesses, create plans for building skills and managing specific challenges, lower stress levels for both yourself and your child, communicate effectively, and cultivate balance and harmony at home and at school.

If you are a parent, caregiver, or mental health professional, this book provides a valuable guide.”


Full details of how BorrowBox works and how to sign up are on our BorrowBox page. You can also view the full library of ebooks and audiobooks here.