Author Archives: Sarah Jones

We won! Innovation Centre success

Dan, Ross and Gerallt at the St David Awards
Dan, Ross and Gerallt at the St David Awards

The Cerebra Innovation Centre (CIC), a partnership between Cerebra and the University of Wales Trinity Saint David (UWTSD), has won a prestigious award for Innovation, Science and Technology Award at the annual St David Awards ceremony organised by Welsh Government.

CIC is a team of engineers based within UWTSD’s Swansea College of Art. They design and build innovative, bespoke products to help disabled children to discover the world around them. Their designs are desirable and exciting as well as functional, promoting social inclusion and peer acceptance for the children they help. Products and advice are provided to families free of charge.

The St David Awards are the national awards of Wales and are nominated for by the public.  Now in their sixth year, the Awards offer the opportunity to celebrate the nation’s most inspiring and talented people, and to give them the national recognition they deserve.  The finalists and winners are decided upon by the First Minister of the Welsh Government and his advisers.  The winners of the nine St David Awards categories were announced at a special ceremony that took place in the Senedd in Cardiff on March 21st.

“The CIC team are so proud to have won the St David Award!” said Dr Ross Head, Product Design Manager, CIC.  “Our jobs give us so much satisfaction; to be able to help children access activities that most people take for granted is a great privilege but to be recognised nationally for our work is simply amazing. A huge thank you to all of the Cerebra staff and our supporters, without whom we would not be able to fund this work. We believe that, with a little bit of help, anything is possible – I hope that winning this award will pave the way to helping many more children across the UK.”

Tracy Elliot, Head of Research and Information at Cerebra added:  “We are delighted to have won the St David Award 2019 for Innovation, Science and Technology.  We believe passionately that the young people we support should be able to take part and participate fully in society.  We develop innovative and, above all, fun solutions to the problems and barriers parents raise with us.  Our designs aim to reduce some of the social stigma attached to disabilities by making not only functional but beautiful products that enable our young people to participate in activities that are too often closed to them.  We aim to demonstrate what can be achieved with the right attitude and support and hope that by winning this award some of our passion and belief will influence others.”

Ross and the team develop logical, innovative and fun solutions for children with brain conditions.  Their designs aim to reduce some of the social stigma attached to disabilities by making not only functional but also beautiful products for amazing young people. Some of their products are ‘one-off’ bespoke designs, others are made in small batches and some are designed with the commercial market in mind.

The ethos of CIC is simple – if they can dream big, they can do big. Never accept it’s not possible. The Team have designed lots of equipment to help children in disabilities participate in activities such as surfing, horse riding and even triathlons. Last Autumn CIC helped six-year-old Imogen, who has cerebral palsy, reach the top of south Wales’ highest mountain in a specially modified four wheeled mountain bike.

Imogen’s mum, Catherine, explained the difference the team have made to her family: “Imogen was so thrilled and excited to have completed the climb. It’s only thanks to the team at Cerebra that she’s been able to have this adventure. She’s never been able to do anything like this before because of her cerebral palsy. There have been so many times that she hasn’t been able to join in with physical activities which leaves her feeling left out. Being able to do things like this is a real boost to her confidence and self-esteem. We really are over the moon that CIC have won this Award.”

Professor Ian Walsh, Dean of UWTSD’s Swansea College of Art is extremely proud of the team, adding: “The University is delighted that the Cerebra Innovation Centre has won such a prestigious award. The innovative and inspirational work of the Centre has transformed countless lives over the past 15-years”.

If you have an idea for something that you think the team could help with, please get in touch at [email protected].

Christine Bunting takes on her biggest challenge yet as she prepares to trek to Mount Everest Base Camp

Christine with her equipment to get her to base camp
Christine with her equipment to get her to base camp

Christine Bunting, a lawyer from specialist Court of Protection law firm Hyphen Law, is about to take on the biggest challenge of her life as she prepares to trek to the world-famous Mount Everest Base Camp to fundraise for Cerebra.

The tough trek will involve climbing the legendary Everest Trail to Base Camp a (literally) breath-taking 5,360 metres above sea level. To put this into perspective, the highest mountain in the British Isles is Ben Nevis in Scotland stands at just 1,345 metres!

As a lawyer who has worked with many families of children with acquired brain injuries and other brain conditions over the years, Christine is passionate about raising awareness and much-needed funds for us.

Christine is delighted and honoured to have received advice and support from renowned adventurer Sir David Hempleman-Adams, the first person in history to reach the Geographic and Magnetic North and South Poles as well as climb the highest peaks in all seven continents, the ‘Adventurers’ Grand Slam’.

Christine will start her trek from the southern side of Everest, putting more than 12 months of training into practice to take on the epic hike. Her training regime has included borrowing a Hypoxic Training Machine from the Altitude Centre to improve her fitness and to help her adjust to the altitude she will be facing.

Christine is flying to Kathmandu, Nepal to prepare for the adventure on 4 April and after a short flight to Lukla Airport, rated the most dangerous airport in the world due to its high terrain and steep drops, she will start her 13-day trek with fellow climbers in the heart of the Himalayas.

She will begin a two-day walk to the village of Namche Bazaar to begin acclimatising to the high altitude and then trek for another two days to Dingboche to acclimatise further before starting her four-day ascent to Everest Base Camp. 

Christine in training for the high altitude
Christine in training for the high altitude

Christine said: “I love to get out of my comfort zone for charity and in recent years I’ve skydived over Salisbury Plain and wing walked on a 1940s Boeing Stearman biplane doing  heart-stopping aerobatics to raise money for Cerebra; but this is my biggest challenge to date!

“I can’t say I am looking forward to the possibility of getting altitude sickness or the extreme cold – rumour has it that it can reach minus 15 degrees at night – but while the trek will be a significant physical and mental test for me, it’s nothing compared to the challenges that families with children living with brain conditions deal with every day of their lives.

“The climb to Everest Base Camp will be an experience of a lifetime and to be able to do it while raising funds for Cerebra’s tremendous work supporting children with brain conditions and their families is a fantastic opportunity.”

Chris Jones, Chief Executive at Cerebra said: “Families where a child has a brain condition face challenges every day. Just to learn, play, make friends, enjoy and experience the world can feel difficult, even impossible. But we don’t believe there’s any challenge that can’t be overcome. We rely on the generosity of our supporters to fund our work and so we are so very grateful to Christine for taking on yet another challenge of her own and wish her a safe and successful trip”.

If you’d like to make a donation to Cerebra, Christine has set up a Just Giving page. She is funding the trek herself, so any money raised will go directly to the charity. To donate please go to: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/chrisbunting1.

Christine is director of Hyphen Law, a team of highly experienced specialist lawyers and support staff working solely on Court of Protection cases relating to property and affairs and the creation and management of personal injury trusts. The team works with clients, case managers, solicitors, families and support teams to deliver services tailored to their clients’ needs.

Cerebra Innovation Centre shortlisted for a St David Award

L - R: Gerallt, Tracy and Ross accept the St David Award nomination
L – R: Gerallt, Tracy and Ross

The Cerebra Innovation Centre (CIC), a partnership between Cerebra and the University of Wales Trinity Saint David (UWTSD), has been shortlisted for a prestigious St David Award.

CIC is a team of engineers based within UWTSD’s Swansea College of Art. They design and build innovative, bespoke products to help disabled children to discover the world around them. Their designs are desirable and exciting as well as functional, promoting social inclusion and peer acceptance for the children they help. Products and advice are provided to families free of charge.

The St David Awards are the national awards of Wales. The team have been nominated for the Innovation, Science and Technology category, which celebrates those who have developed techniques or solutions that meet new requirements.

The ethos of CIC is simple – if they can dream big, they can do big. Never accept it’s not possible. The Team have designed lots of equipment to help children in disabilities participate in activities such as surfing, horse riding and even triathlons. Last Autumn CIC helped six-year-old Imogen, who has cerebral palsy, reach the top of south Wales’ highest mountain in a specially modified four wheeled mountain bike.

Imogen’s mum, Catherine, explained the difference the team have made to her family: “Imogen was so thrilled and excited to have completed the climb. It’s only thanks to the team at Cerebra that she’s been able to have this adventure – she’s never been able to do anything like this before because of her cerebral palsy. There have been so many times that she hasn’t been able to join in with physical activities which leaves her feeling left out. Being able to do things like this is a real boost to her confidence and self-esteem. We really are over the moon that CIC have been shortlisted for this Award.”

Prof Ian Walsh, Dean of UWTSD Swansea College of Art said: “The University is delighted to hear that the Cerebra Innovation Centre has been shortlisted for such a prestigious award. The innovative and inspirational work of the Centre has transformed countless lives over the past 15-years”.

Dr Ross Head, Product Design Manager at the Cerebra Innovation Centre added: “It is such a privilege to be nominated for an award for doing a job that is so fun and rewarding to do anyway. I hope this will draw attention to our work so that we can continue to grow and help more children achieve more amazing dreams!”

The winners will be announced at the St David Award ceremony which takes place on 21st March.

World book day in our library

Thursday 7th March is World Book Day and we have lots of story books that are suitable for children of all ages available to borrow from our Library.

Young children

Sometimes by Rebecca Elliott

A colourful picture book for young children.

“Toby knows his sister Clemmie is very brave.  When she has to go to hospital, they both have to help each other face their fears.  Together they make hospital a much better place “.

Avery by Marta Altes

A lovely picture book for young children

“Avery is like other birds most of the time, but sometimes, feels a bit different.  But Avery is not alone”.

The Five of Us by Quentin Blake

An illustrated story for young children

“Angie, Ollie, Simona, Mario and Eric are five fantastic friends, each of whom has an unusual ability.  Disaster strikes on a day out to the countryside but, working together and combining their individual powers, the Fantastic Five save the day”.

5 to 8 year-olds

Ellie Bean the Drama Queen: how Ellie learned to keep calm and not overreact by Jennie Harding

A story explaining sensory processing disorder for 5 to 8 year olds.

“This cute children’s book offers insights into Ellie’s “dramatic” behaviours and provides easy sensory answers for parents and teachers alike.  Ellies’s story brings home what it’s like to grow up with sensory issues and helps a child to understand that he or she is not alone”.

Ian’s Walk A Story About Autism by Laurie Lears

A story explaining autism for children aged 5 to 8

“Julie can’t wait to go to the park.  But she’s not sure she wants to take her little brother, Ian, who has autism.  Ian does things differently.  At the park, he doesn’t like the tickle of a soft feather, but he loves to lie down and press his cheek against the hard sidewalk.  It’s hard for Julie to understand Ian.  But when he gets lost, Julie discovers that seeing the world differently, through Ian’s eyes, is the best way to find him”.

My Brother is Autistic by Jennifer Moore Mallinos

An illustrated story for siblings aged 5 to 8 who have a brother or sister with autism

“Having a brother with autism can sometimes be hard, especially when he freaks out in front of other kids at school.  It can be so embarrassing!  Maybe if the kids knew more about autism they’d stop teasing and making fun of Billy and just be nice”.

8 to 12 year-olds

Lulu and the Wishing Star by Pippa Fern

A heartwarming story about disability for children aged 8 to 12

“When Lulu and Sam make a wish to the Wishing Star, the young and trendy, guitar-playing fairy, Rock’n’roll-rockety-roo’ appears.  She grants their wish (well… sort of) but in her rush to catch a rock concert, forgets to leave instructions.  Can Lulu and Sam figure out their newfound powers in time to save their friend?”

Jumpin’ Johnny Get Back to Work! A Child’s Guide to ADHD/Hyperactivity by Michael Gordon

A fun story explaining ADHD for 8 to 12 year olds

“This story is told by a youngster who truly struggles to achieve, but doesn’t always meet with success and acceptance.  Although he moves through the day experiencing frustration and embarrassment, he still maintains his sense of humour and spirit of determination”.

The Panicosaurus by K I Al-Ghani

A story about managing anxiety for children with Asperger Syndrome aged 8 to 12

“Sometimes the Panicosaurus tricks Mabel’s brain into panicking about certain challenges, such as walking past a big dog on the street or when her favourite teacher is not at school.  With the help of Smartosaurus, who lets her know there is really nothing to be afraid of, Mabel discovers different ways to manage Panicosaurus, and defeat the challenges he creates for her”.

If you’d like to borrow any of these books, completely free of charge, contact our librarian on [email protected]. To find out more about the library check out our library page.

Designing a better future for children with brain conditions with help from South Wales Freemasons

L - R: Marc Lewis (Assistant Provincial Grand Master), Robert Payne (Charity Officer), Terry Osborn (Head of Income Generation at Cerebra) and Ross Head (Innovation Centre Designer and Developer)
L – R: Marc Lewis (Assistant Provincial Grand Master), Robert Payne (Charity Officer), Terry Osborn (Head of Income Generation at Cerebra) and Ross Head (Innovation Centre Designer and Developer)

Our Innovation Centre and the work they do to help children take part in and enjoy life alongside their friends has been given a boost, thanks to a generous donation of £38,749 by South Wales Freemasons.

One of the many ways we support children with brain conditions and their families is through our (CIC). At the CIC, a small team of innovators design and build bespoke products to help children overcome the challenges they inevitably face when taking part in activities that non-disabled children may take for granted.

The generous grant will contribute significantly to the salary costs for the Centre’s talented design team for one year, ensuring that the Centre can continue to make a difference to the lives of children across south Wales, and beyond.

Representatives from the South Wales Province visited the Cerebra Innovation Centre on Monday 28th January 2019 to learn more about the Centre’s innovative work and some of the children who will directly benefit from their support.

One of the children they met was two year old Amelie from Swansea who has quadriplegic cerebral palsy. Before Christmas the team made a Bouncer for Amelie which has made a huge difference to her daily life.  The Bouncer allows Amelie to move independently, something that she would otherwise be unable to do. She loves the swinging sensation and can enjoy this while the seating gives her all the postural support she needs. Mum Lucy explained that Amelie loves her Bouncer as it allows her to move on her own and have fun. The Bouncer also strengthens Amelie’s legs and core muscles so it’s great exercise for her too.

Amelie
Amelie

Ten year old Bailey is also from Swansea and has been enjoying the Spinning Pod that the Innovation Centre designed and made for him. Bailey has a life threatening brain condition, is blind and autistic. Bailey has a great love of music and really enjoys bouncing and spinning – so the new chair is perfect for him. In the chair Bailey feels safe and cocooned and can spin it himself which is great for his independence and also for him to self-soothe when he feels frustrated. His mum Charlie explained that that the chair is his new safe place and he spends a lot of time in it playing the piano and with his toys. She added that it’s ‘Bailey proof’ – very sturdy and unbreakable!

Staff and pupils from Ysgol Crug Las, a special needs school in Swansea taking pupils from ages 3 – 19, also attended the event.  Head teacher Clare Hobson explained that the school has a close and long standing relationship with the Innovation Centre.

Terry Osborn, Cerebra’s Head of Income Generation, said “We’re very grateful to South Wales Freemasons for their generous grant, which will allow us to help hundreds of young people with cerebral palsy, autism and similar conditions to enjoy everyday life in the same way as everyone else.”

Rob Payne from South Wales Freemasons, said:

“I’m delighted we’re able to support Cerebra, who do outstanding work helping some of the most vulnerable people in our community to have access to the same opportunities and lifestyle as the rest of us.”

You can find out more about the Cerebra Innovation Centre and view their whole product portfolio here.

CIC is a partnership project with the University of Wales Trinity Saint David and is based within its Swansea College of Art.

Samuel discovers freedom with his Oxy-gem

Samuel and his oxy-gem
Samuel and his oxy-gem

Samuel’s mum Joceline recently contacted our Innovation Centre. As a member of a parent group on Facebook, she had seen how another child had benefited from our Oxy-gem. She knew that it would be perfect to help Samuel.

Three year-old Samuel has Down’s Syndrome and small airways disease. This means that he is on oxygen 24/7 and whilst he can walk, he could not carry the weight of his oxygen cylinder so his mobility was extremely restricted.

Joceline knew that the Oxy-gem could greatly improve Samuel’s independence and the Innovation Centre team were happy to help!

We sent Samuel one of our Oxy-gems in time for him to take it for a test drive around Blenheim Palace!

Joceline told us: ‘It was the first time he’d been able to participate on foot, rather than in his buggy.  You can see the excitement on his face.  The trolley went for a good 20 mins, on the path, on the grass, through the leaves….it was a life liberating day for him. He also uses it at school twice a week and it’s brilliant.  

Thank you so much for your help with this. I cannot begin to tell you how valuable the Oxygem is to us.  It has freed our son from the shackles of a buggy and helped him develop his independence and core strength and physical stamina.’

If you would like to find out how the Cerebra Innovation can help you, whether that’s with the Oxy-gem or if you have another challenge for the team, please get in touch! Email [email protected].

Cerebra to benefit from Co-op Community Fund

Vanessa with Dylan, Ryan and Taran
Vanessa with Dylan, Ryan and Taran

This year we have been chosen to benefit from the Co-op Local Community Fund.

At a time when funds for charitable organisations are becoming more difficult to access, we are incredibly grateful for this opportunity to make real difference.

We are raising funds so that we can continue our work to help families who have a child with a brain condition to discover a better life together. Families who have a child with a brain condition such as autism, cerebral palsy or Down’s Syndrome face challenges every day. Just to learn, play, make friends, enjoy and experience the world can feel difficult, even impossible. But we don’t believe there’s any challenge that can’t be overcome.

Support from the Co-op Community Fund will help us to carry on supporting families like the Hoopers from Kidwelly. For seven-year-old Ryan Hooper and his family, getting a good night’s sleep was a constant struggle until they discovered Cerebra.

Ryan has Down’s syndrome and the condition often causes poor or disturbed sleep, something that affected him and had a knock-on effect on the whole family. When his mum, Vanessa, heard a representative from Cerebra speak four years ago at a local Down’s syndrome support group, she was keen to find out more about how the charity could help her son. Helping him to get a better night’s sleep was at the top of her wish-list.

Vanessa says “Cerebra’s sleep service was invaluable to us. Whenever I called they’d answer my questions and reassure me I could cope. The sleep practitioners helped us countless times and were able to get us into a routine, which gave some normality to our daily life”.

To help raise the vital funds, we’ll be relying on Co-op shoppers. Every time they buy Co-op own brand products they get a 5% reward for themselves, and a further 1% goes to local causes like ours. Co-op members can decide which local group they would like to back by going on-line at www.coop.co.uk/membership. We really hope that people will visit the website and choose to support us.

If you’re not a member and would like to support us, you can join at your local store or online at www.coop.co.uk.

When a community comes together we’re able to achieve great things, so we hope you can help promote our project.

Watch Vanessa explain what it’s like to have a child with a brain condition who doesn’t sleep well:

Joshua’s Transition Part 1

Emma tells us about the period of transition that her son, 17 year-old Joshua is about to face and the services that are available to help the transition. 

Joshua

I have always feared Joshua becoming older as it felt like a step into the unknown. Every birthday sounded so much older than the year just gone, the jump from 9 to 10 years old for instance seemed enormous, but of course it wasn’t at all, it is just a number. Now the jump from 17 to 18 , where we are approaching now, that is a significant change. In the eyes of the law, Joshua will become an adult next March, when he turns 18. I cannot keep my head buried in the sand about this one, this change is approaching rapidly and so I need to face it head on.

“I don’t need to think about that yet surely!”

Even as young as 15/16, health and education professionals referred to ‘Transition’ and I tried hard to ignore them and joke that I did not know what would happen next week, never mind that far ahead. But the references to transition did not go away, they gathered pace and they cropped up when we saw his neurologist who would be handing him onto an adult neurologist, our children’s epilepsy nurse who has taken care of his seizures since he was 4 years old would be passing him on and in his Education Health Care Plan meetings, when they would ask what we wanted Joshua to do when he left school at 19? I wanted to shout out loud “Stop it, he’s only 16… I don’t need to think about that yet surely!!” We had finally got to a comfortable place – he was in the best school for him, we had found respite provision that suited us all and we had established doctors who knew and understood him – and now, because of an anniversary, everyone wanted to throw all that we had carefully built up into a big bag and shake it up. I resisted it with all my might.

Opportunity

Then something changed this May and I began to relax and embrace the change, to see it as an opportunity rather than a threat. This change was due largely to one person: a social worker who was allocated to us from ‘Futures Plus’, who would represent Joshua once he was an adult. She paid us several visits, getting to know both us as his parents and Joshua in his home, school and respite session. She always delivered what she promised to do and most importantly, she listened, giving us the time to explain how we felt or how things are, she even saw my husband and I separately, which  nobody has done before, to explore our very different perspectives.

Respite for young people

In my mind I had envisaged adult daycare and respite services as being grim places, where my 18 year old son might be mixing with 80+ year old dementia sufferers, with the staff trying to juggle their very different needs. Our social worker immediately explained that there were facilities specifically for young people  and so I relaxed and decided that Joshua might actually enjoy the next step of his life, rather than it being a necessary evil. She visited all of the local adult respite places and even rated them from her own perspective, but encouraged us to visit each one to make up our own minds. I am confident that she too is determined to find somewhere suitable for Joshua’s needs. We have prioritised Respite as his current facility cannot have him beyond 18, whereas he can stay at school , in 6th form, until he is 19 so we have an extra year to find daycare solutions. So far we have looked at 2 of the 4 in our local authority area and I plan to get round the others this month. Joshua had to go out of area for his current short breaks and we have been reassured that if there is nothing suitable locally, we can argue that Joshua’s needs can only be met by a provision out of area. So far I have to say that I have found nothing that comes close to his current provision. I will not compromise, he will not be going somewhere mediocre just because it is local. I now know what I am looking for, as we have experienced the best, and I will keep searching until I find it.

Change

I have never been good at change, it always seems to be forced upon us just when things are settled. I can recall begging Joshua’s nursery school head teacher if he could stay with her until he was 16 please. She replied kindly, “No Emma, he can’t, he will get to be too big for the furniture here”. We made the move to mainstream primary, then to a special school and then to his current special school so, given that I hate change, we have done a fair amount of it in Joshua’s 17 years and of course, we survived. The difference is that this time we have a social worker by our sides who will help us to negotiate our way through this mysterious maze and help to pull us through – I am sure.

As we approach March 5th, I will update you on how we are handling transition and will outline the highs and lows that we are bound to face. I sincerely hope that our experience may help some of you who might also have a son or daughter who is approaching this critical age. I do not want to scare those readers who have ten year-olds now, but this Transition will come much faster than you think, so it is worth thinking about it sooner, rather than later. If I had read that in 2011, I know I would have ignored that advice, thinking that it was not relevant to me, but I would urge you not to be an ostrich like I was. Perhaps you can learn from my mistakes, so that you can hear the ‘transition’ word without a shudder.

You can read more from Emma in her article ‘Introduction to us‘ and on her blog Ups and Downs Mum. If there are any topics you would like her to write about let us know in the comments.

Imogen draws our Christmas raffle winners

Imogen with (L-R) our Head of Income Generation Terry Osborn, Neil form Specsavers and CEO Chris Jones
Imogen with (L-R) our Head of Income Generation Terry Osborn, Neil form Specsavers and CEO Chris Jones

We held our Christmas raffle draw on Wednesday 19th December and had a very special guest do the honours.

Seven year-old Imogen has had an impressive year having climbed Pen y Fan with a little help from our Innovation Centre and it only seemed right that she should help us with this very important job!

We were also joined by Neil Robinson from Specsavers, who named us as their charity of the year in south and mid Wales and have done amazing for us over the course of the year.  

We had our giant tombola filled with over 100,000 Christmas raffle tickets that our generous supporters had purchased and Imogen dived right in, choosing the three top prize winners and ten runners up.

The top three winning tickets are below and the rest will be available here soon. Check your tickets!

PrizeWinning Ticket Number
£5,0000801486
£1,5000406934
£5000668630

Making dreams come true this #GivingTuesday

#Giving Tuesday is on November 27th and this year we’re celebrating the amazing work our Innovation Centre do to help children achieve their dreams, however big or small. Children like Imogen, who we helped to achieve her dream of making it to the top of south Wales’ highest peak. You can help us make even more children’s dreams a reality. A gift from you, whether large or small, will make a positive difference to a young person’s life. You can either text WISH07 £5 to 70070 to donate £5, or use the form at the bottom of this page to donate online. Thank you.

Six year old Imogen was born with cerebral palsy and needs a wheelchair to get about. She often can’t take part in activities that her friends take for granted. She wasn’t even allowed to take part in her school sports day. Like most children her age Imogen is lively and adventurous and her inability to get involved makes her feel frustrated, sad and lonely.

At Cerebra, we don’t believe there is any challenge that can’t be overcome. When our friends at Specsavers arranged a sponsored walk to the top of Pen-y-Fan, we thought ‘let’s see if we can take Imogen with us’.

Help us work wonders for children this #GivingTuesday

Our Innovation centre adapted a special four-wheeled mountain bike and, with support from a team of volunteers, Imogen showed grit, determination and stamina to make it to the top. The smile on her face says it all.

With your help we can make more children's dream become a reality

With your help we can make more children’s dream become a reality

Imogen’s mum, Catherine told us: “Imogen is thrilled and excited to have had this adventure. She’s never been able to do anything like this before because of her cerebral palsy. There have been so many times that she hasn’t been able to join in with physical activities which leaves her feeling left out. Being given the opportunity to do things a child her age should be able to do is a real boost to her confidence and self-esteem. she really is over the moon.

If they can dream big, they can do big - never accept it's not possible!

If they can dream big, they can do big – never accept it’s not possible!

Imogen’s next dream? To become a Paralympian. Watch this space!

#GivingTuesday is on 27th November and you can follow our conversation on our social media – we will be using the hashtags #GivingTuesday and #Cerebra. We would also love to hear if you will be taking part in any fundraising – be sure to tag us! Please help us to make even more children’s dreams come true this #GivingTuesday.
Text WISH07 £5 to 70070 to donate just £5.

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Photos by Dimitris Leakis/ Athena Pictures