Tag Archives: Autism

Autism and Mental Illness: a Teenager’s Perspective

Mair Elliott

Mair Elliott

Mair Elliot shares her experience of living with both a mental illness and Autism.

“Since 14 years old I have had doctors, psychiatrists, psychologists, therapists, nurses, occupational therapists, dieticians, support workers, counsellors… and various other professionals poking and prodding at the psychological mess in my head. I have tried more medications I than I can count on my hands, and I have taken more pills than I’d care to divulge. I have tried talking therapies upon talking therapies, some of which I know so well I could easily facilitate a course for someone in need (but I won’t).

Some people may find my recent decision to reduce the professional help I receive currently to just a phone call once a month a bit risky or odd. But the truth is I have never been able to develop strategies to help myself by myself. Falling ill during my teenage years resulted in me not only missing a heck of a lot of school, but I also missed out on the opportunity to discover how I would live my life, how I would be me, and even who I was/am. I was told how I was supposed to live my life, or I was told what was ‘healthy’. Which was fine during the time I was incapable of looking after myself.

But now I am able to look after myself, at least at the basic level. What I find frustrating is that the generic advice given to me from almost all of the people I have met, is not actually moulded in a way I can live with. Don’t get me wrong, I needed professional help to keep me alive, and I will always be grateful for the tireless efforts of the professionals, and people who had to deal with me during a very dark time in my life. But I have encountered an illusion which I believed was real for a very long time.

Let me create a metaphorical example, I am assuming that all of you have seen circus workers/clowns/or pretty much anyone create balloon animals. Well let’s say that when I was ill I was just an empty balloon. Getting professional help and advice meant that I could fill my balloon with air. It’s better than it was before, because at least now it’s inflated, but it’s just a long thin balloon. In order for it to become a balloon animal I have to twist, turn and mould the balloon until it’s an animal like shape. The only thing is, I don’t have detailed instructions, only very brief outlines.

Over the years I have been given some helpful advice on how to live my life in a healthy and happy way, but I need to take that advice and personalise it. I need to work out how that advice is going to fit into my life, and the way I live it. I need to work out which advice I have been given is going to work for me, and which advice is not going to help me.

When I discovered I was ill, I made the assumption that all I needed was a bit of therapy and possibly a bit of medication, and then I would be back to exactly who I was before I fell ill, or even a better version of who I was. I was naïve enough to believe that I would get better and be completely 100% healthy, and my life would be amazing and sparkly. I also thought that getting better was just a straight line on a graph upwards (anyone who’s been to therapy will understand the graph of recovery comment I just made).

After 10 weeks of therapy and several failed attempts of trying medication, you’d think I would have realised that this wasn’t the case, or at least when a year had gone by and I ended up living on a psychiatric unit. But the truth is I didn’t realise that I wasn’t going to make some miraculous recovery for about 3 years.

When I had this realisation I could finally takes steps towards recovery. I understood for the first time that I was going to have to put myself out there, and pretty much expect to fail continuously until I worked out ways that I could cope with life. As an obsessive perfectionist it was not a comfortable realisation, but I knew that I was going to have to work hard, and that I was going to have to accept that I was not going to do well in every step and decision I had to make. Sometimes I was going to fall down or get sucked back into old ways, and I had to be OK with having a recovery graph that looks more like a squiggle on page than a logical and tidy straight line upwards.

And this is why I don’t believe in full recovery. I can always be getting better, I can always be improving things for myself. Full recovery suggests to me that there is an end to this journey, and I don’t want that to be the case. I will always be Autistic, I might reach a point in which I am symptom free from my mental illnesses. But that won’t mean that I won’t still face challenges, in fact I know I will definitely face challenges because being Autistic sometimes in not easy.

I have gotten to the point now where I have addressed the fundamental problems I faced when I was ill, such as not eating, self-harming and self-destructive behaviour. I had the expertise of professionals to help me get to this point. But now I have to address the issues I face with life outside of my illnesses. Issues like how do I deal with Autism and maintaining professional and personal relationships, what is it that I really enjoy and how can I make it a career, what is it that helps me be happy and healthy, and most importantly what are the things which I cannot change and how can I come to accept them.

In order to work out answers to my questions, in order for me to live a long and happy life, I believe I need space now to explore. So that is why I have decided to reduce the professional help I receive down to a phone call once a month. I know when I need to ask for help, and I understand that my journey is far from easy, but for now I know this is the right decision for me.

If I have learned anything from the past few years is to never take the simple things for granted, like the love and support from family and friends, or the ability to smile and be happy”.

Mair gave us full permission to publish this article which first appeared on her blog.

You can also read Mair’s article “Puberty and My Autism Diagnosis”.

Sexuality, Autism and Young People – Families Study

The Sexuality, Autism, and Young People- Families study (SAY-Families) is a joint project between Warwick, Bangor and Glasgow Universities.  Researcher Stacey Hunter explains more about the study and how you can get involved.

“The aim of the SAY-Families study is to find out about how the parents of young people with High Functioning Autism or Asperger syndrome talk to their children about relationships and sex education. A developing sexuality is one of the key challenges that young people face as they grow up, and it is important to find out about families’ experiences of supporting their child in this sensitive area. It is hoped that by finding out parents’ views and experiences, the study will be able to inform the development of support materials for young people and their families.

To find out parents’ views and experiences, we are carrying out one-to-one interviews and have developed an online survey. If you think you might like to take part in either part of the study, more information is below. If you would like to talk to one of the research team, please also feel free to give us a call, we would be more than happy to hear from you (our contact details are also below).

The face-to-face interview

We would like to speak with the parents of young people aged between 16 and 30 years old, who also have a sibling of a similar age that is the same gender as them. This is because we would like to find out if your experiences of supporting each of your children in this area have been similar or different.

One of the research team, will speak with you on the phone to arrange a time that is suitable for you to take part in an interview. The interview can take place in your home or somewhere else that is convenient. You can also arrange for your interview to take place over the phone, if that suits you better. The interview will last roughly 45 minutes.

Online Survey

We are also looking for the parents of young people with High Functioning Autism or Aspergers aged between 16 and 30 years old to fill in an online survey. The survey can be completed by one or both parents of a young person. If you would like to take part as a couple, we ask that you fill in the survey independently and indicate that you would like your responses to be linked.
You can access the online survey here. 

Many thanks for taking the time to read about the SAY-Families study. If you would like to take part or would just like find out more about the project please do not hesitate to contact us:

Stacey Hunter
School of Psychology
Brigantia Building
Bangor University
Bangor, Gwynedd
LL57 2AS

Tel: 01248 388255
Email: Stacey.Hunter@bangor.ac.uk

Resources – December 2015

ResourcesWhere can I get a free PC?
Where to find free or low-cost computers. (Neil Hawkins)

Tax-free childcare:  ten things parents should know
Tax-Free Childcare will be available to around 2 million households to help with the cost of childcare, enabling more parents to go out to work, if they want to, to provide greater security for their families. Here’s the top ten things to know about the scheme. (HM Treasury and others)

Spending Review:  what it means for families with disabled children
Summary based on the Chancellor’s recent announcements. (Derek Sinclair, Contact a Family)

Kidtection
An agency providing nanny services by the hour for 8-16 year olds, including special needs.

Guides for children and young people

Youth Mental Health
An information hub offering young people advice and help on mental health problems including depression, anxiety and stress,  (NHS Choices).

Get your rights
Everything you need to get the most out of the NHS,  (Council for Disabled Children and National Children’s Bureau).

All about information, advice and support services
A website for young people up to the age of 25,  (Council for Disabled Children and National Children’s Bureau).

Young Person’s Guide to Personal Budgets in England
(Together for Short Lives).

Staying safe online
Top ten tips.  Leaflet designed for young people who may be about to go online with a new computer, tablet etc.,  (National Police Chiefs’ Council).

Guides for parents and carers

Babies In Mind
A free online course about ways in which parents and caregivers can influence the mind of a child from conception to infancy,  (University of Warwick).

Autism and Thanksgiving
How to cope with feasting and hubbub.  An article about the USA Thanksgiving celebrations that adapts to other situations of “holiday excitement”,  (Autism Speaks).

Upfront guide to caring
Online tool to help new carers to find the information and support they need,  (Carers UK).

How to teach a person with ASD how to cook
Article by Maureen Bennie, (Autism Awareness Centre).

Guide for parents who are formula feeding, and Building a happy baby
Two leaflets, (UNICEF).

News – November 2015

A stack of newspapersOur monthly roundup of news and legislation relevant to families who have children with neurological conditions.

Ambitious Colleges
Ambitious About Autism plan to open two more college facilities for young people with autism, from Summer 2016 in Tottenham and from September 2017 in Isleworth, London. (Ambitious College).

Epilepsy Passport
A downloadable template Epilepsy Passport has been developed by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health. This is a record that families can use for emergency healthcare visits and other situations.

Autism Diagnosis Crisis
The National Autistic Society invites people to join their campaign for earlier diagnosis of autism.

Victims of Crime
A new Code of Practice for Victims of Crime has been published.  It includes various provisions for victims with disabilities, (Ministry of Justice.  Applies to England and Wales).

New NICE guidance: 
Quality standards on Challenging behaviour in learning disabilities; and Bipolar disorder, psychosis and schizophrenia in children and young people, (National Institute of Health and Care Excellence).

Immunisations
A quick guide to immunisations for the parents of premature babies, (NHS). Updated to reflect this year’s changes to the schedule.

“Supporting the Attainment of Disadvantaged Pupils”
A new report by the Dept for Education describing what has worked in selected schools around the country.

Legislation

2015 asp 11, British Sign Language (Scotland) Act 2015
Prepares for the preparation and publication of plans in relation to British Sign Language by certain national organisations.

2015 No. 1754, The Universal Credit and Miscellaneous Amendments Regulations 2015
From dates between November 2015 and April 2016, a number of adjustments to the rules for receiving Universal Credit.

2015 No. 1778 (C. 108), The Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015 (Commencement No. 3 and Transitional Provisions) Order 2015
From 26 October, means that 17-year-olds who are interviewed or detained by police must now be treated as under-17s in some ways (such as forms of assistance, and care from the local authority).

2015 No. 1776, The National Health Service (Exemptions from Charges, Payments and Remission of Charges) (Amendment and Transitional Provision) Regulations 2015
Changes the rules for entitlement to reimbursement of NHS-related costs (optical, travel etc.). Families can still claim under the old rules for charges incurred up to 31 October 2015.

Consultation

Local area SEND consultation
About inspections of local areas’ effectiveness in identifying and meeting the needs of children and young people who are disabled and have special educational needs. There are separate versions for adults and children to respond to.
Closing date: 4 January 2016 (applies to England. Ofsted, with the Care Quality Commission).

Resources – November 2015

ResourcesOur monthly round-up of useful resources for parents of children and young people with neurological conditions.

Plain Facts
A magazine and tape for people with learning difficulties, describing research topics of interest, (Norah Fry Research Centre, Bristol).

“What good looks like in psychological services for children, young people and their families”
A new handbook published by the British Psychological Society as psychological services are under review, (links to a free download).

Grow Wild UK
Grants of £1,000 to £4,000 for community wild flower projects.  Closing date for Spring 2016 projects, 1 December 2015, (Lemos & Crane with Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew).

Book on Autism
A parent has recommended to us a new book on autism, “Neurotribes: The Legacy of Autism and How to Think Smarter About People Who Think Differently”, by Steve Silberman. It won the 2015 Samuel Johnson prize for non-fiction and has attracted some high-profile reviews, for example The Guardian at: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/aug/23/neurotribes-legacy-autism-steve-silberman-book-review-saskia-baron. The reference given by our parent member was: http://bookshop.blackwell.co.uk/jsp/id/Neurotribes/9781760113636.

Top tips for getting around on public transport
A short video for young people with autism, (Ambitious About Autism, myVoice project).

Five tips that helped improve my child’s behaviour
From a mother of two boys with autism, (Autism Speaks).

Seasonal resources

Cold Weather Plan for 2015-16
This year, pregnant mothers are classed as one of the vulnerable groups.  The Plan follows NICE (National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence) guidance and the strategy “Cutting the cost of keeping warm” by the Dept for Energy and Climate Change.  It includes a system of cold weather alerts for England.

Epilepsy and Flashing Lights
Short article about minimising any risk of a seizure triggered by festive flashing lights, electronic screens or fast-changing light and dark patterns, (Dr Fergus Rugg-Gunn, Epilepsy Society).

DIY Sensory Play
Five recipes for play materials to make at home for children with sensory difficulties (playdough, finger paints etc.), (Multi-Sensory World).  There are some small sensory presents for sale on the same website, and a blog with tips on dealing with sensory issues).

Sensory Toy Warehouse
More small sensory items.

8 presents for young children with cerebral palsy
A parent’s article about toys that her son enjoys, followed by a comments section where other parents share their successful ideas, (“Mrboosmum”).

Sensory toys
Autism West Midlands are selling a Christmas Sensebox and Glowbox.

Special needs and special occasions
Ideas for where family gatherings, etc. might be awkward. Other potentially stress-busting articles are referenced at the bottom of the webpage (Terri Mauro, About.com).

Puberty and My Autism Diagnosis

Mair Elliott

Mair Elliott

Mair Elliott, now aged 18, shares her experience of being diagnosed with Autism as a teenager.

“Most of us will know the time, the time when we suddenly got really grumpy, our bodies started sprouting hair from random places, we started to spend a lot more time ‘hanging out’ with our friends. The time when everyone suddenly became obsessed with relationships and sex, and when everyone wanted to try the latest ‘must haves’. People started to wear different clothing and tried different styles . Our parents drove us up the wall, and school always set too much homework. You guessed it; the teenage years.

Many of us will remember those precious few years as being full of fun, experimenting, heartbreak, excitement and a little confusion. No one has smooth sailing through puberty, all of us were desperate to ‘find ourselves’. Most will find their paths, and learn to sail the rough seas of growing up. But what happens when your whole world is turned upside down by a few simple words, slap bang in the middle of those unstable years?

I was 14 when something started going wrong, I didn’t have a clue what it was. Low moods, an inability to concentrate, lack of interest in things. I brushed it off as ‘teenage angst’ after all that’s what’s supposed to happen isn’t it? But over a couple of months things got worse and I felt low all of the time, I wasn’t sad, I wasn’t anything really, just empty. And then the worrying and stressing kicked in. The fear and nervous energy began to sing its song in my head. I would be reduced to a quivering ball of tears and breathlessness, something which I now know as a panic attack. I had no control over what my head was doing, but it was certainly not doing as it was supposed to. I started hurting myself, not something which came as a decision but more as an instinct when I couldn’t deal with how I felt. I could no longer face eating, and slowly restricted what I put in my mouth, which again was not a conscious decision, it wasn’t something I had control over.

Luckily, a teacher in school had noticed, she referred me to school nurse, who promptly referred me to mental health services. I met with a psychiatrist, something which could be a blog post in itself! I was never good at speaking about how I felt, because I never actually was able to understand how I felt. But after a couple of sessions the psychiatrist said something which would change my life forever.

“I think you might be on the Autism spectrum.”

I was given a diagnosis of Autism at 15 years old, I was also diagnosed with Depression and Anxiety, just to complete the set.

I had always known I was different, but at a young age I took matters into my own hands and decided to learn how to be ‘normal’. I would watch other children and copy what they did, mimic their body language and facial expressions, and I learn what words they used. And this became my obsession, people were my obsession. So no, it probably wasn’t noticeable that I had autism to the untrained eye. All the stereotypical things that people think of when it comes to autism, I just didn’t do. For example, I learned how to make eye contact, I hated it but I did it because that’s what everyone else did, my obsession was people, so I didn’t have any obviously unusual obsessions, I could speak and communicate well because I had taught myself how.

Being given a diagnosis during the years in which I was supposed to be figuring out who I was, blew everything into confusion. I started questioning the everyday things, whether or not they were ‘autistic’ things or just me. Questions like, ‘what does this mean for the future?’ And, ‘Am I going to be able to live a ‘normal’ life?’ started cropping up. My mental illness had declined to the point where I required hospitalisation. All the while I was desperate to work out who I was.

I quickly started to believe that I was destined to be the ‘crazy’ one. The ‘crazy cat lady’ or the ‘mad hatter’. Because all of these things, the mental illness, the autism discovery completely blew my world into pieces. And I was subjecting myself to stigma which the rest of the word was waving in my face. I thought that I would be ill, and unsuccessful because apparently that Is who I’d become during those years. Whilst my friends were out experimenting, trying new things, developing their personalities and becoming people, I was in and out of hospital, meeting with doctors and nurses, taking medication, having meltdowns in the school corridors and needing stitches every couple of days.

I am now 18, I am a lot better, and doing well. I believe that I have managed to reach the other side of the terrible teenage years. My path through was completely different to my peers, who have all recently embarked on their new journeys in University. But I think the most important thing I think that I have recently discovered, is that I don’t have to be the ‘crazy’ one, I can be who I want to be. I have autism, and that’s ok. I have depression, and that’s ok. I have anxiety, and that’s ok. In the past I have thought that those things will define me for the rest of my life, that I would always be known by my autistic traits. But now I know that although those things are part of me, they cannot and will not define who I am as a person. They do not have that kind of power over me, and I won’t ever give them that kind of power ever again. I can search for who I am , and I can become something which does not allow my diagnoses to set any limits on my abilities. And of course Autism comes with its advantages, for example once I find something I like I have the drive and willpower of a police dog on the scent of explosives to pursue that topic of interest. I can see the world in a completely different way to most other people, and I think my view of the world is a beautiful one.”

Mair gave us full permission to publish this article which originally appeared as guest blog on the website aspertypical 

Safety gate success for the Innovation Centre

Cole in the car with his safety gate

Cole in the car with his safety gate

The Cerebra Innovation Centre were recently contacted by Nicola, the mother of four year-old Cole.

Young Cole  suffers from Tuberous Sclerosis – a rare genetic condition that can cause benign tumours to grow all over his body, as well as Epilepsy and Autism. He also has behaviour and communication difficulties.

Cole has a baby sister, 9 month old Myla whom he loves her dearly, but his sensory issues mean that he likes to hear her cry, often meaning that he can get overly excited and lashes out at her.

Mum Nicola told us: “This is bad enough in the house as Myla can at least be kept out of Cole’s way but in the car, even with a harness, he still managed to get to her. I would only take the kids out together to places that were close by  and where I could distract Cole with food. Even then driving was stressful and I often had to pull over to stop him getting to her. It was dangerous because I was constantly worrying about what he was doing and so didn’t have full concentration on the road.”

After trying various different solutions from harnesses to dog guards with little success, Nicola contacted the Cerebra Innovation Centre to see if the team could develop a new solution to keep everyone safe whilst out and about in the car. The team came up with the safety gate.

“The Safety Gate is fantastic! It looks great and even looks like it is part of the car. It has a window and little holes so Myla and Cole can still see each other. Cole loves it – I think it makes him feel secure as he likes small spaces but the best thing is that I can drive without worrying because I know my daughter is safe. We can now go further afield in the car together and it has made everyday life so much easier. I can’t thank the Innovation Centre team enough. It has changed our lives.”

The Cerebra Innovation Centre are always eager to hear from parents with their ideas for new products and that’s where you come in! If you have an idea for a product that you can’t find anywhere else or need a product adapted to meet your child’s needs, then get in touch! You can contact the team at cic@cerebra.org.uk or 01792 483688.

Volunteers Needed for Research Study

EU-AIMS study

EU-AIMS study

European Autism Interventions – A Multicentre Study for Developing New Medications (EU-AIMS) are looking for volunteers to take part in exciting new research.

Their latest study will be looking at brain development and behaviour in both the general population and in people with autism spectrum disorder.

They are looking for children, young people and adults aged 12 – 30 years old to take part in their research.

The study will involve online questionnaires as well as two half-day visits to the Institute of Psychiatry in London. The visits would include in-person tasks and tests , a brain scan and a blood or saliva sample.

If you would like any further information, please contact eu-aims@kcl.ac.uk or 02078480844.

You can also visit their website here: www.eu-aims.eu

Autism Awareness Bestsellers in our Library

autism booksWe thought you would like to know that Jessica Kingsley’s (Publishers) ‘Autism Awareness Bestsellers’ are all available in the Cerebra Library:

The Complete Guide to Asperger’s Syndrome by Tony Attwood
2008 ISBN 9781843106692

This is the definitive handbook for anyone affected by Asperger’s syndrome. It brings together information on all aspects of the syndrome for children through to adults. Drawing on case studies from Attwood’s extensive clinical experience, and from his correspondence with individuals with AS, this book is authoritative and extremely accessible.
L6311 in Cerebra Library

LEGO-Based Therapy: how to build social competence through LEGO-Based Clubs for children with autism and related conditions
2014 ISBN 9781849055376

A comprehensive guide to setting up LEGO Therapy groups to promote social skills in children with autism spectrum disorders and related conditions through group LEGO building. It fully explains the approach and gives advice on strategies for successfully seeing children through from ‘LEGO Helper’ to ‘LEGO Genius’.
L6621 in Cerebra Library

Aspergirls: empowering females with Asperger Syndrome by Rudy Simone
2010 ISBN 9781849058261

Rudy Simone guides you through every aspect of both personal and professional life, from early recollections of blame, guilt, and savant skills, to friendships, romance and marriage. Employment, career, rituals and routines are also covered. Simone rejects negative views of Aspergirls and empowering them to lead happy and fulfilled lives.
L6275 in Cerebra Library 

The Red Beast: controlling anger in children with Asperger’s Syndrome by Haitham Al-Ghani
2008 ISBN 97818343109433

This vibrant fully illustrated children’s storybook is written for children aged 5+, and is an accessible, fun way to talk about anger, with useful tips about how to ‘tame the red beast’ and guidance for parents on how anger affects children with Asperger’s Syndrome.
C0176 in Cerebra Library 

All Cats Have Asperger Syndrome by Kathy Hoopman
2006 ISBN 9781843104810

This book takes a playful look at Asperger Syndrome, drawing inspiration from the feline world. Touching, humorous and insightful, this book evokes the difficulties and joys of raising a child who is different and leaves the reader with a sense of the dignity, individuality, and potential of people with AS.
C0147 in Cerebra Library 

Can I Tell You About Asperger Syndrome? a guide for friends and family by Jude Welton
2003 ISBN: 9781843102069

Meet Adam, a young boy with AS. He helps children understand the difficulties faced by a child with AS, telling them what AS is, how it feels to have AS and how they can help by understanding their differences and appreciating their many talents. This illustrated book is an excellent starting point for family and classroom discussions.
C0093 & C0233 in Cerebra Library

Parenting a Child with Asperger Syndrome: 200 tips and strategies by Brenda Boyd
2003 ISBN 9781843101376

Brenda is mother to thirteen-year-old Kenneth, author of Asperger Syndrome, the Universe and Everything. Brenda discusses parents’ reaction to their child’s AS and gives advice on how better to understand ‘Planet Asperger’. This book helps parents to respond positively to the challenge of AS and find the ‘treasure’ in their child’s way of being.
L6279 in Cerebra Library 

Freaks, Geeks and Asperger Syndrome: a user guide to adolescence by Luke Jackson
2002 ISBN 9781843100980

Drawing from his own experiences and gaining information from his teenage brother and sisters, Luke Jackson wrote this enlightening, honest and witty book in an attempt to address difficult topics such as bullying, friendships, when and how to tell others about AS, school problems, dating and relationships, and morality.
L6291 in Cerebra Library

Borrowing something from the library is free, please email janetp@cerebra.org.uk to request a book or for more information about the library service.

Books in the library on autism

Library booksWe have a great number of books on autism in the library.  Here are just a few of the most popular ones:

  • L6178 – A Will of His Own: reflections on parenting a child with autism by Kelly Harland
  • L6133 – Adolescents on the Autism Spectrum by Chantal Sicile-Kira
  • L6179 – Animal Assisted Interventions for Individuals with Autism by Merope Pavlides
  • L6428 – Autism Spectrum Disorders Through the Life Span by Digby Tantam
  • L6015 – Autism Spectrum Disorders: the complete guide by Chantal Sicile-Kira
  • L6359 – Autism the Facts by Simon Baron-Cohen
  • L6221 – Autism: a very short introduction by Uta Frith
  • L6027 – Autism: facts and strategies for parents by Janice E Janzen
  • L6496 – Carly’s Voice: breaking through autism by Arthur Fleischmann
  • L6337 – Children with Autism: a parents’ guide by Micheal D Powders
  • L6583 – Colour Coding for Learners with Autism: a resource book for creating meaning through colour at home and school by Adele Devine
  • C0193 – Explaining Autism by Robert Snedden
  • L6581 – Gardening for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Special Needs by Natasha Etherington
  • L6514 – George and Sam by Charlotte Moore
  • L6256 – Growing up Severely Autistic: they call me Gabriel by Kate Rankin
  • L6595 – Navigating the Medical Maze with a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder by Sue Ming
  • L6255 & L6332 – Playing Laughing and Learning with Children on the Autism Spectrum by Julia Moore
  • L6532 – Raising to New Heights of Communication and Learning for Children with Autism by Carol Spears
  • L6498 – Silently Seizing: common unrecognised and frequently missed seizures and their potentially damaging impact on individuals with autism spectrum disorders by Caren Haines
  • L6392 – Sleep Difficulties and the Autism Spectrum Disorder by Kenneth Aitken
  • L6405 & L6614 – Speak Move Play and Learn with Children on the Autism Spectrum by Lois Jean Brady
  • C0091 – Ten Things Every Child with Autism Wishes You Knew by Ellen Notbohm
  • L6526 – The Anger Box: sensory turmoil and pain in autism by Phoebe Caldwell
  • L6491 – The Autistic Brain: thinking across the spectrum by Temple Grandin
  • L6495 – The Reason I Jump: one boy’s challenge from the silence of autism by Naoki Higashida
  • L6077 – The Siege: a family’s journey into the world of an autistic child by Clara Claibourne
  • L6186 – Through the Eyes of Aliens: a book about autistic people by Jasmine Lee ONeill
  • L6267 & L6308 – Understanding Autism for Dummies by Stephen Shore
  • L6207 – Voices From the Spectrum: parents, grandparents, siblings, people with autism by Cindy Ariel
  • L6174 – Why Does Chris Do That? by Tony Attwood
  • L6591 – Yoga Therapy for Children with Autism and Special Needs by Louise Goldberg

DVDS

  • AV6399 – A is for Autism by Tim Webb
  • AV6136 & AV6539 – Autism and Me by Rory Hoy
  • AV6397 – Living Along the Autism Spectrum

If you would like to borrow any of these books, it is free, just contact Jan on janetp@cerebra.org.uk

We also have many books on High Functioning Autism and Aspergers, that are not necessarily covered in this list.